JessiDevs Weekly Rundown: November 8, 2020

A few articles I think are worth reading this week!

Jessi Pearcy
Nov 8, 2020 · 4 min read
Photo by TUAN ANH TRAN on Unsplash

This week I’ve been continuing to focus on improving my efficiency when it comes to working in the front end.

Digging right on into how to effectively use Flexbox and CSS Grid is a great way to make framing up a new UI element quick!

Key article takeaways:

  • “The most important thing to know is that flexbox is one-dimensional, while CSS Grid is two-dimensional. Flexbox lays out items along either the horizontal or the vertical axis, so you have to decide whether you want a row-based or a column-based layout.”
  • “On the other hand, CSS Grid lets you work along two axes: horizontally and vertically. Grid allows you to create two-dimensional layouts where you can precisely place grid items into cells defined by rows and columns.”
  • “CSS Grid focuses on precise content placement.”
  • “Flexbox focuses on content flow rather than content placement.”
  • “Flexbox treats each row independently. Different rows align flex items differently, based on the amount of text inside of them.”
  • “Using the flex-grow and flex-shrink properties, you can achieve a completely fluid layout that optimizes the allocation of flex items at every viewport size.”

Bonus: This bomb UI Card Codepen.

Key Takeaways

  • Why isolate styles in an Angular app? “As we develop a component style suite for an application, we tend to run into situations where the styles from one feature start interfering with the styles of another feature…If we are not careful and systematically organize our styles…we will quickly run into CSS maintenance issues.”

I have worked as a marketing project manager, a product owner, and now a web developer. Something that all teams struggle deeply with is how to appropriately estimate projects. Every project I’ve ever worked on has suffered from this bias in some way. Our human tendency to be optimistic both about estimating work in the face of unknowns and in understanding the impact of setbacks is something that I am both aware of, but fall prey to as well.

Key Takeaways:

  • “The conjunctive events bias makes us underestimate the effort required to accomplish complex plans. Most plans don’t work out. Things almost always take longer than expected. There are always delays due to dependencies.”
  • “Plans don’t work because completing a sequence of tasks requires a great deal of cooperation from multiple events. As a system becomes increasingly complex, the chance of failure increases. A plan can be thought of as a system. Thus, a change in one component will very likely have impacts on the functionality of other parts of the system. The more components you have, the more chances that something will go wrong in one of them, causing delays, setbacks, and fails in the rest of the system.”
  • “The conjunctive events bias teaches us to be more pessimistic about plans and to consider the worst-case scenario, not just the best. We may assume things will always run smoothly but disruption is the rule rather than the exception.”

That’s it from me this week! Thanks for reading with me. Any articles you all would recommend I check out?

This rundown is a post from my newsletter JessiDevs! JessiDevs is a weekly, curated rundown of articles, books, and topics that will help you learn to code, keep that code clean, and learn to learn more effectively. Click here to sign up to receive updates right to your inbox.

The Startup

Get smarter at building your thing. Join The Startup’s +794K followers.

Sign up for Top 10 Stories

By The Startup

Get smarter at building your thing. Subscribe to receive The Startup's top 10 most read stories — delivered straight into your inbox, once a week. Take a look.

By signing up, you will create a Medium account if you don’t already have one. Review our Privacy Policy for more information about our privacy practices.

Check your inbox
Medium sent you an email at to complete your subscription.

Jessi Pearcy

Written by

Exploring software development, healthy habits, and building a working life! Sign-up for my newsletter for new devs at jessidevs.substack.com

The Startup

Get smarter at building your thing. Follow to join The Startup’s +8 million monthly readers & +794K followers.

Jessi Pearcy

Written by

Exploring software development, healthy habits, and building a working life! Sign-up for my newsletter for new devs at jessidevs.substack.com

The Startup

Get smarter at building your thing. Follow to join The Startup’s +8 million monthly readers & +794K followers.

Medium is an open platform where 170 million readers come to find insightful and dynamic thinking. Here, expert and undiscovered voices alike dive into the heart of any topic and bring new ideas to the surface. Learn more

Follow the writers, publications, and topics that matter to you, and you’ll see them on your homepage and in your inbox. Explore

If you have a story to tell, knowledge to share, or a perspective to offer — welcome home. It’s easy and free to post your thinking on any topic. Write on Medium

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store