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The Weakness and Strength of Mental Health Issues

Kristina H
Apr 6, 2019 · 4 min read

What are some of the mental health issues that you may struggle with?

Is it Anxiety? Depression? PTSD? Or any other mental stress that you deal with?

Do they make you feel weak? Or do they strengthen you?

Think about that for a moment…

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Photo by Sarah Cervantes on Unsplash

The Good News- Strength

I have anxiety and PTSD, and I take medication for depression.

Good times.

However, I have recently determined that my mental health doesn’t make me weak. In fact, it does the complete opposite. It makes me realize how truly strong I can be. The same goes for anyone who deals with chronic anxiety or other issues.

You overcome a battle EVERY DAMN DAY. Not only do you overcome it, but you kick its ass.

Why? Because you are still alive. You have survived another day with the voices and noises of doubt in your busy brain.

Consider what you accomplish in a day. You get up, get dressed, go to work, deal with the kids, traffic, administration, diet, and every other vibration of chaos in your head. And you succeeded to face another day.

Bravo!

Your mental illness is a challenge unlike any other. It fights with you to keep you inside your own head, and keeps you back from leaving your comfort zone. But, you are STRONG and you can end the day and wake to the next.

People without mental struggles don’t understand how hard it is to accomplish day to day tasks. Period.

You are strong, amazing, and determined. Menial tasks are harder for you, but you did them.

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Photo by Wladislaw Peljuchno on Unsplash

The Bad News-Weakness

The weakness we share with mental health issues can be crippling.

We may not be able to get out the door to go to work. We may not be able to face a day at the office surrounded by happy people, and the thought of being in public is scary and exhausting.

It weakens us to the point of self doubt, self loathing, and often disables us to the point of not being able to take on small tasks.

But, it’s okay.

Why? Because other people with mental health issues get you. They understand and there are so many people in the world who share these feelings, it’s not difficult to reach out.

There are support groups, therapists,websites, online groups, peers, family, friends, colleagues, and so many other avenues to research or reach out to, that are available for us. It is just a matter of understanding that we aren’t alone in this fight, even when we feel completely alone.

It is hard as hell to face certain days and various situations, especially when it comes to anxiety and depression. We envision scenarios in our minds of how these tasks or situations will go, and although our assumptions are often wrong, they are strong enough to make us avoid them all. They remind us of our weaknesses.

Overcoming this weakness takes all of our strength. And we need to find that strength.

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Photo by Raul Varzar on Unsplash

What I Know

I know that anxiety is a fickle bitch. It is hard to understand and extremely unpredictable, unless you have a good knowledge of your trigger history.

You can wake up one morning feeling refreshed, you drive to work, and BOOM, something enters your mind and you fight the urge to turn around and go home to crawl under the covers.

Alternatively, you wake up feeling “off” and you feel as though the entire world is just too damn heavy for you to contend with, but something (your inner strength) pushes you out the door. You suck it up, go to work, and have a fabulous productive day.

It’s all par for the course. Some days medications are your best friend, some days you despise how they make you feel. One day a good workout is what you need, while the next, you can barely pour your first cup of coffee as it feels too daunting. I have felt it all.

The key is to share how you feel. Write, read, talk, cry, find an outlet, or whatever it takes. You need to find that inner strength that no one else understands, and fight. Some days are knock down, drag out fights, and other days are silent arguments in your own head. Finding someone who understands it is an immeasurable help. There is always someone, somewhere who will get it.

Using your inner strength, your powerful inner voice to tackle your challenges is the key to handling your mental health.

You are a fighter.

And you’ve got this.

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The Startup

Medium's largest active publication, followed by +752K people. Follow to join our community.

Kristina H

Written by

Writer of relationships / early childhood and mental health . Poetry and fiction dabbler

The Startup

Medium's largest active publication, followed by +752K people. Follow to join our community.

Kristina H

Written by

Writer of relationships / early childhood and mental health . Poetry and fiction dabbler

The Startup

Medium's largest active publication, followed by +752K people. Follow to join our community.

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