Six Simple Rules for Better Navigation UX — Interaction Design Foundation

by Andres Amador / from beautifuldecay.com

I was reading today a great post from Interaction Design Foundation about six simple rules for better navigation UX and I could highlight some interesting phrases.

your text should say what it means and mean what it says

Run away from the thinking “I’m responsible for what I say but I’m not responsable for what you understand”. Take care about the meaning of what you say. Think if your user will understand exactly what you want to say.

The more familiar your users are with the words you use; the easier they will find them to understand.

Use words that are used in daily of your users,this will make it easier their understanding. And more, familiar words can help you to write texts that “say what it means and mean what it says”, because they help you to avoid any misunderstand.

Keep the reading age as low as possible

The post talk about Fleisch-Kincaid score that are readability tests designed to indicate how difficult a reading passage in English is to understand. I think its interesting and navigation on the internet to read more about this tests a could find this website that cal calculate the score of a text, but not only Fleisch-Kincaid score, this website can calculate Gunning-Fog Score, Coleman-Liau Index and more!

Never reinvent the wheel unless it’s absolutely necessary. Use familiar icons, descriptions, etc. that have become an industry standard.

Not only the words should be familiar for the user, icons should be too. You must use how many apps you can keeping attention of standard of icons that has been used. Be you familiar with standards to develop apps with familiar(intuitive) navigation.

Nobody likes to be told what to do. Nobody likes to be SHOUTED AT. You need to design your navigation to feel supportive and reassuring. The objective is always to get the user to where they want to go with the minimum of fuss.

Be gentle to support…

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