CHART: Nigeria’s Telecom Subscribers (2017–2021)

Active telecommunication subscriptions across all networks, including mobile, fixed, wireless and VoIP in Nigeria reached 185 million at the end of December 2019, up from 173 million as of December 2018, according to the latest statistics released yesterday by the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC), the country’s telecoms industry regulator. In this Techloy chart, we highlight the growth and estimated growth of active telecom subscriptions in the country from 2017 to 2021, which is expected to cross the 200 million mark by 2021, according to Techloy projections, based on the average annual growth rate over the past five years.

Editor’s Note: Thank you for using our infographics or sharing them on social media. Find more insights via http://medium.com/techloy/insights/home.

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Techloy is a digital publication covering news and data about business, finance and technology, using infographics and charts to help people and brands make better decisions.

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Covering news and insights into technology and business in Africa. Get in touch: techloy.com@gmail.com | +2347030851462

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