6 Concrete Ways to Help Your Child With ADHD

How to build a world that makes sense to them — and you

Katie E. Lawrence
The ADHD Handbook

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Photo by Phil Goodwin on Unsplash

It’s difficult to have ADHD. It’s also difficult to parent someone who has ADHD. If you’re a parent of a child with attention overdrive, then you and my mom would probably be friends.

“The children who need love the most will always ask for it in the most unloving ways.”― Russel Barkley

For eighteen years, (thirteen of which involved homeschooling me), my mom dealt with my undiagnosed ADHD until my doctor confirmed my suspicions about it during my freshman year of college.

Now, I work at a school with many children who are neurodivergent and learning to learn with their different brains. I also research mental health and study family science, learning more

#1: Limit their screentime

From my own experience and watching the kids in my life, I've learned that screen time is a dangerous beast — especially for those of us who are dopamine-sensitive.

One of the greatest ways to help an ADHD kid is to stop them from spending time on screens. By establishing limits early and clearly, you can train your children to find their entertainment elsewhere.

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Katie E. Lawrence
The ADHD Handbook

Soon to be B.S. in Human Development & Family Science. I write about life, love, stories, psychology, family, technology, and how to do life better together.