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The High Road Can Be Hard to Travel But it Leads to Peace of Mind

Photo Credit: www.theodysseyonline.com

Growing up, I had little to no self control. I acted on impulse, reacted to things that never deserved my attention and always let my temper get the best of me. All of which only led me down an unhappy road. It took me a really long time to understand, so many people and things in this world, don’t deserve a response or reaction. A wise man once said “Don’t argue with fools — because those in the distance can’t tell who’s who”. While it’s not always an easy philosophy to practice or truly live by, I can assure you it’s worth it.

After two very turbulent weeks of dealing with multiple family emergencies, one in which involved telling my eleven year old nephew his estranged father had passed away — as his mom waits to be placed on the transplant list for a new heart, at only the age of 33 — a random fan of rapper Talib Kweli’s read this article I wrote almost a year ago and began tweeting at me. While I ignored it at first, eventually it got annoying and I responded. I was polite at first but than I had a drink or two and became less friendly.

Then, this morning — the troll was back at it again. He retweeted my angriest reply to him and there we were again with the back and forth. While his aim was clearly to get under my skin, I know better than to let people of the sort succeed in their senseless mission. People like them only do such because of how incessantly and inherently unhappy they are with themselves and their own lives.

The irony in all of this of course is the fact all of this stems back to a tweet I sent Talib himself, just suggesting people who were tweeting racist shit at him were not worth his time. He completely flipped what I said and tried to make it out like I was trying to silence him and was on the side of those sending hate his way over the internet. He also assumed I was a Trump supporter. He was wrong on both counts. I find few things to be as cowardly as people who talk trash over the internet. I wouldn’t initiate such nonsense but I’m guilty of responding to mindless trolls who have tweeted at me.

It’s ironic because Talib and his followers claim to be about social justice and standing up for what’s right. Behind his response to me, came an army of trolling social justice warriors, insulting and harassing me over Twitter. They adopt this herd mentality and follow him blindly, based off false assumptions he’s made. I guess I just fail to see how ganging up on an individual over the internet, to tweet insults at them qualifies as a form of justice. Mainly because it’s not one and is just a way for them to perpetuate the hate they have inside their hearts, the hate that stems from how much they dislike themselves.

Shortly after Talib and I exchanged a handful of tweets nine months ago, my phone was overwhelmed by responses, tweets and mentions from his gang of bootleg social justice warriors. I realized how silly the whole thing was and blocked him. However, I made the mistake of unblocking him after some idiot on Twitter claimed I “ran from the conversation”. Pride goeth before the fall.

I unblocked him and sure enough, there him and his virtual gang were back tweeting at me. I’d like it understood, I could give a fuck about what strangers on the internet who idolize a hypocritical washed up rapper think or say about me. It just leads to too many notifications and my phone going berserk. It’s a distraction from the things that actually matter in life — it takes my focus off of the positive and leads to arguing with trolls over the internet. My Saturday’s are meant for reading, writing and running. After I’ve gotten my fair share of all three in for the day — the remainder is for family, friends and fun. I have no time or business arguing with fools on Twitter.

Just so we’re clear, he’s assuming I benefit off of injustice based off his assumption I’m white

I don’t know if you’ve ever had a barrage of insulting tweets coming in non stop from people you’ve never met but I won’t lie — it’s a bit much. I don’t know how celebrities do it, Talib included. Then it hit me, I could just turn off my push notifications and just let them argue with themselves and the silence I’m now sitting in as I write this. My peace of mind returned immediately and I sat down and began writing. While I’m sure I still have strangers with nothing better to do than try to convince themselves they’re standing up for what’s right by spreading hate, I’ve got no time for it. It’s 92 degrees in Philly right now and I’m about to go sit poolside and read for the rest of the afternoon.

Rapper Talib Kweli — A True Gentleman and Scholar

Thanks For Reading

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Brian Brewington

Brian Brewington

Writing About the Human Condition, via My Thoughts, Observations, Experiences, and Opinions — Founder of Journal of Journeys and BRB INC ©

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