9 Steps to Writing Every Day

How I Developed the Habit and How You Can Too

August Birch
The Book Mechanic
Published in
9 min readAug 27, 2018

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Build the daily writing habit once and for all

I’ve heard the statement since the day I started my writing education. Writers must write every day. It sounds so romantic and noble. But when the rubber meets the proverbial keyboard, ‘writing every day’ is a damn-hard habit to develop. At least, it was a hard habit for me. Maybe it’ll be easy for you.

Daily writing is something I’ve struggled with for years. I wanted it badly, but I didn’t have the right framework in place. I tried about every method you can think of. I’d write for a couple weeks straight then something would derail me. Once stopped, it was much harder to get my cheeks in the seat.

Maybe you’re struggling with this too. Writers are weird people. We want to have the ‘writer’ title and we love writing once we’re doing it, but we’ll do just about anything to avoid the process — look! there’s laundry to be done.

There are many caveats to daily writing For every writer who swears by this practice you’ll find another who writes only in sporadic cram-sessions. This story isn’t meant as a debate on all the merits and pitfalls of daily writing. If daily writing is a habit you’ve tried to develop in the past, but failed, this story is for you.

Why I Believe in Daily Writing:

As a writer, or any crafts-person, your job is to grow a little every day — to hone your craft and be better than yesterday you. If we’re not growing we’re shrinking. There’s no stasis in life. What might feel like stasis is digression masked as temporary comfort.

Yes, there are plenty of writers who make a very good living going on long writing retreats, pumping out large volumes of work, and taking long breaks between sessions.

I’m not one of those sporadic writers.

When I wrote in sprints, the work comes out manic and thin. I felt the pressure to crank out 8,000 words in a day, or more. I’d do this for a week or two, cranking out an entire manuscript in three weeks or less. Then I’d crash at the end and write nothing for months. Or, I’d sprint half the manuscript and sit on it.

As I revisited these sprinted manuscripts I found the work disjointed. I couldn’t remember…

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August Birch
The Book Mechanic

Blue-Collar Marketing Mentor for Writers and Creators | Join My One Welcome Workweek Challenge Here: https://augustbirch.com/ow2