Rethinking Einstein’s ‘Theory’

E=mc2: What did he miss?

Photo by Maks Key on Unsplash

Is Einstein’s general relativity, now more than one hundred years old, the greatest discovery of all time? ‘Common Sense,’ a book by Ilexa Yardley answers this question with an affirmative ‘yes.’ And, also, a definitive ‘no.’

Common Sense

Available on Amazon.com, ‘Common Sense’ shows Einstein’s special theory of relativity (c2=e/m) is more simply (and most technically) the conservation (think: tokenization) of a circle (pi=c/d), explaining why it is ‘Common Knowledge’ (another book by Yardley) the core requirement (and assumption) in Nature is the number ‘two.’

Meaning, an always-present (always-prescient) circle is the core requirement (the constant) in (and the explanation for) physics, psychology, biology, and technology, what we know in mathematics as the variable, and, in reality, as perpetual uncertainty.

Nature’s odds? 50–50. Something all of us rely on as a core assumption. Meaning, technically, the answer to every question is both ‘yes’ and ‘no.’

Redundancy and Repetition
Thus, according to Yardley, the formal description for general relativity, like all mathematical descriptions, suffers from the problem of redundancy (repeating constants) when, in nature, there is only one constant:

The Only ‘Constant’ in Nature

Universal Relativity, Uncertainty, Entanglement and Intelligence
The notion that everything is connected by pi proves there is an underlying intelligence in nature, having to do with general, more correctly, universal, relativity as the basis, where the conservation of a circle gives ‘intelligence’ to ‘everything’ via the conservation of complementarity, symmetry, and uncertainty. Or, more simply, the conservation of identity.

Meaning, we already understand everything there is to understand about physics (philosophy, and psychology) (technology in general).

In layman’s terms, the space all around us is pi, as a circle, separating and joining, everything to, and from, everything, a constant, hidden, variable, oscillation, potential, and real. Meaning, technically, pi is the only observer.

Thus, circularity ties Albert Einstein and Carl Jung (physics and psychology) (technology and biology) together, proving (and explaining why) everything is cyclical.

Quantum Entanglement on a Much Broader Scale

Where, again, because it’s not possible to have a circumference without a diameter, it’s not possible to have energy without mass. Because it’s not possible to have a half without a whole (explaining spin theories, quantum entanglement, and the required (simplified) (unified) architecture for quantum computing).

Conservation of the Circle (incorrectly thought of as the conservation of energy) is the most basic (and, therefore, the only) dynamic in Nature.

See, also: General Relativity. Space joins (and separates) any X… | by Ilexa Yardley | The Circular Theory | Jun, 2022 | Medium

Correcting Einstein’s Math. Commutators, Groups, Rings, and… | by Ilexa Yardley | The Circular Theory | Medium

Hawking, Galileo and Einstein: Life and Death on Pi Day | by Ilexa Yardley | The Circular Theory | Medium

Solving Einstein’s Problem. The string of characters. | by Ilexa Yardley | The Circular Theory | Medium

Einstein, Relativity, and Technology | by Ilexa Yardley | The Circular Theory | Medium

Jung, Einstein, and Noether: The Technology Behind Physics | by Ilexa Yardley | The Circular Theory | Medium

What Einstein’s Theorem Really Means | by Ilexa Yardley | The Circular Theory | Medium

What Einstein Missed (That the Rest of Us Understand) | by Ilexa Yardley | The Circular Theory | Medium

How Einstein (and Galileo) Screwed Up Physics | by Ilexa Yardley | The Circular Theory | Medium

Albert Einstein’s Birthday (3.14) | by Ilexa Yardley | The Circular Theory | Medium

Moving From Relativity to Circularity | by Ilexa Yardley | The Circular Theory | Medium

General Relativity , Yardley, Ilexa — Amazon.com

Guide to the Circular Theory

Readers are reminded this material is Copyright Ilexa Yardley all rights reserved.

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