A Story of 1800 Exploding Stars

The Cosmic Companion
May 31 · 4 min read
Supernova explosions can outshine entire galaxies for months. Public domain image

The Hubble Space Telescope recorded the light echo of supernova SN 2014J, found in the galaxy M82, 11.4 million light-years from Earth. Credit: NASA Goddard

A Type I supernova can result when a star pulls matter off a large companion (left), and the resulting explosion can result in the remaining objects merging (right). Image credit: NASA’s Goddard Spaceflight Center

The location of the supernovae (red) discovered by astronomers taking part in this new study. The blue circles represent individual fields seen during the study, and an image of the Moon is placed for scale. Image credit: Sloan Digital Sky Survey/Kavli IPMU/Partial data supplied by: SDSS

Some of the supernova examined in this new study. Each star is seen before (left), and after (center) the explosion, and the right image of each set represents the difference between the two other images. Image credit: N. Yasuda et al.
The death of a massive star in our own galactic neighborhood. Credit: Chandra X-ray Observatory

The Cosmic Companion

Exploring the wonders of the Cosmos, one mystery at a time

The Cosmic Companion

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James Maynard is the author of two books, and thousands of articles about space and science. E-mail: thecosmiccompanion@gmail.com

The Cosmic Companion

Exploring the wonders of the Cosmos, one mystery at a time