First AI Model of the Universe Knows Science it was Never Taught

The Cosmic Companion
Jun 26 · 4 min read
A soft glow of light seen in images of the galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1–2403 is the product of stars let loose from their stellar families by the effects of gravity. After leaving their galaxies, the stars aligned within regions dictated by local gravitational forces, which may reveal patterns of dark matter in the Universe. Image credit: NASA, ESA and M. Montes (University of New South Wales)

Comparing the AI-driven D3M model to the earlier 2LPT scenario shows that D3M is significantly more accurate than earlier models. These images reveal differences between both of these faster models, compared to results from a slower simulation. Dark blue dots show the smallest discrepancies between each faster simulation, compared to slower systems, while light blue reveals areas of high discrepancies compared to more accurate models. Image credit: S. He et al./Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 2019

Fritz Zwicky was an astronomer well ahead of his time, postulating questions in the 1930’s that remain unsolved in the 21st Century. Image used under fair use.
Vera Rubin was a pioneer in the astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology. Image used under fair use.
The most “boring” galaxies in the Universe could hold the secrets to understanding dark matter. Credit: NASA Goddard

The Cosmic Companion

Exploring the wonders of the Cosmos, one mystery at a time

The Cosmic Companion

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James Maynard is the author of two books, and thousands of articles about space and science. E-mail: thecosmiccompanion@gmail.com

The Cosmic Companion

Exploring the wonders of the Cosmos, one mystery at a time