Follow Us

To follow the 3,000+ Tweets written for this project, we have set up five separate accounts, each with a different editorial function with descriptions below.

Additionally, you can see all of the tweets in Twitter’s chronological display on our TWITTER LIST for the project . Here’s what you’ll see:


Below are the individual accounts and sample tweets:

@1927Diary is the the overall project account of “1927: The Diary of Myles Thomas.” It is the only account aware of the world beyond 1927.

@1927Diary will tweet out all of Myles’s diary entries as they’re published, as well other editorial components of the project, including essays about 1927.


@MylesThomas27 is the personal account of our protagonist.

Myles’s account lives exclusively within the world of 1927 — his tweets are only about the present and the past. Unlike you the reader, he does not know the outcome of the season, or anything else in his future.

@MylesThomas27 also will be retweeting posts of major players and celebrities of his time.


@FordFrick is the account of our faithful beat writer and letter correspondent, Ford Frick.

As with your favorite baseball writer in 2016, the main purpose of @FordFrick is to “live tweet” the 1927 Yankees’ season, in order to chronicle in real time the Yankees’ historic season and Babe Ruth’s epic march to 60 home runs.

@1927_NYYankees is the team account of the 1927 Yankees.

@1927_NYYankees will tweet sporadic updates throughout the games, alerting followers to the Yankees’ best moments. This ’27 team account also will bookend each game by tweeting a starting lineup graphic highlighting key players beforehand, and then by tweeting the original 1927 New York Times game story from the “TimesMachine” after the game.


@1927_NYYankees is the team account of the 1927 Yankees.

@1927_NYYankees will tweet sporadic updates throughout the games, alerting followers to the Yankees’ best moments. This ’27 team account also will bookend each game by tweeting a starting lineup graphic highlighting key players beforehand, and then by tweeting the original 1927 New York Times game story from the “TimesMachine” after the game.


@DidRuthHomer is our nod to those simple, but brilliant “Did Team X Win?” accounts that have been created for virtually every team on the planet.

@DidRuthHomer is a fun twist on the meme, “Did Team X Win?” and an appropriate tribute to the Babe’s gargantuan season and his gargantuan personality.