Why shutting down Josephine isn’t the end of the home cooking movement

Introducing the C.O.O.K. Alliance

Matt Jorgensen
Feb 9, 2018 · 9 min read

Josephine, a food and labor justice startup

But for our team, the success of Josephine would never be measured simply by building a successful business. We were building a movement around home cooks, empathy, and community.

The limitations of the “startup”

For every cook who used Josephine, there were dozens more who preferred to stay underground.

Policy work followed naturally from community-building.

A growing grassroots movement

Though encouraging, this also illuminated the extent of the work needed to change a deeply entrenched system.

But the decision didn’t change who we are or what we committed to.

C.O.O.K. Alliance continues this larger movement

We want to ensure that home cooking helps the people who need it most — the grandmothers cooking grits, the immigrants selling soup, and the refugees sharing stories in the way they know best.

The C.O.O.K. Alliance will always stand for:

What you can do

The Dish

Musings on slow cooking a company in a world built for the microwave @Josephinemeals #withcare

Matt Jorgensen

Written by

Social Innovation Fellow at Fair Care Labs; Coordinator of C.O.O.K. Alliance; Co-Founder & Co-CEO at Josephine

The Dish

The Dish

Musings on slow cooking a company in a world built for the microwave @Josephinemeals #withcare