Your Beliefs Don’t Make You Moral

And a few other limiting characteristics of beliefs

Keri Mangis
The Dissident

--

Photo by Breanna Louise on Unsplash

Here’s a theory: What if we spent less time arguing on behalf of our beliefs and more time ridding ourselves of them? What if the time we spend seeking validation for our beliefs was instead spent tracing them back to their origins, understanding how they limited us, and then setting them free?

What if we decided to live as belief-lite as we possibly could?

The Origin of Morality

Seems crazy, right? To live a life without (or fewer) beliefs? If we didn’t have beliefs, wouldn’t we go around killing each other, stealing, lying, and cheating?

That’s what they tell us, isn’t it? Religion was the first to teach us this, the first to put our existence into context, to give us our origin stories and our sense of meaning and purpose, and, ultimately, to hand us the beliefs to dictate our morality.

Religions and nations have grown around this assumption that human beings, without a set of commandments, without rules and laws and how-tos and experts telling us what to do, would become barbaric. Isn’t that what the right-wing politicians tell us? That more Christianity is what will save society?

--

--

Keri Mangis
The Dissident

I am author and speaker, dedicated to getting out (and staying out) of Plato’s Cave of shadows and deception. Hope to bring a few people with me.