The DO’S & DON’TS — On How to Approach Music Supervisors & Music Consultants!

The music industry changes daily, are you ready to take your game to the next level or are you going to be left behind?

Peter Moore
Mar 25 · 4 min read

his is the second part of the blog series, taking a look at the Do’s & Don’ts of contacting music supervisors & music consultants.

OK, are you an artist/songwriter or band, and curious about how to contact a music supervisor or music consultant?

Well, music supervisors are the music-to-picture gatekeepers, responsible for selecting the tracks and closing the deals between artists and productions for film, tv, Gaming ALL VISUAL MEDIA.

In this episode, we highlight some of the best and worst practices from industry professionals.

You must Do your research

Music supervisors will often narrow down their focus to a few publishing companies, agents, labels, artists that they know and trust — this is particularly important.

This helps them get deals done more quickly and efficiently, with very little fuss.

Before you contact a music supervisor, make sure you know their work, this is especially important, I know it may sound basic, but it’s the way to go!

Blindly sending “listen to my music!” emails is a COMPLETE waste of their time and yours.

Just like your music has its own sound, many music supervisors have their own brand and distinctive credits as well — DO YOUR RESEARCH.

Take advantage of the subject line for the film, game, or TV show

Demonstrate that you researched the supervisor with a crafted subject line in your initial INTRODUCTION email.

If your brand of COUNTRY or POP is perfect for a particular Netflix, Disney, or Amazon series, change up your email or social media introduction with a title, for example: “POP/Country for the nightclub scenes with band.”

The music supervisor on the receiving end will very much appreciate that you are paying attention, this is good brownie points to kick you off on your journey!

Make music that’s authentically yours — DO NOT COPY WHAT'S OUT THERE!

Music supervisors looking for songs typically want music that is real and will resonate with that particular audience.

If your music comes from the heart, your odds for success will greatly improve, I assure you it will!

Likewise, writing a song about tires, for the sole purpose of placing it in a ‘Michelin’ or ‘Pirelli’ commercial, probably will not get you very far at all — see my point?

Photo by Tim Toomey on Unsplash

Try and have a unique presentation, this sets you apart from the COMPETITION.

Established music supervisors receive countless pitches from musicians, bands, music libraries, managers, A&R reps, labels, etc.

Often, it is an email with a generic heading, with a link to a YouTube video or a SoundCloud file.

They could also receive a manila envelope with a thumb drive and a forgettable covering letter. These emails and envelopes mostly go unopened and are usually trashed in the bin.

Try something different to get attention. Send a box of biscuits! Write a unique or personal email header, TRY AND STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD.

Anything that sets you apart will increase your chances of getting them to open the email and give your music a listen — and just maybe getting that DREAM song placement!

Be very polite, but with some GOOD persistence AND DETERMINATION.

There is a fine line between being politely persistent and determined to be coming across as a pain in the arse.

As a rule, attempt to contact music supervisors ONLY three times, maximum.

  • Send an email or an envelope
  • Attempt to reach out to ask if they received it
  • Ask whether they have a use for your music

If you are polite and persistent and you do not land a deal right away, the music supervisor will probably keep you in mind for future projects.

It is a small world, after all. No need to burn any bridges is there.

Do NOT contact music supervisors who don’t want to be contacted.

Music supervisors like Thomas Golubic for his work on (Breaking Bad, and The Walking Dead) would love to hear your music, but be really sure to check if they have a policy and how they wish to receive your songs, JUST DON’T assume!

To learn more about this really exciting area for more tips and information, check out the podcast link below, for this and many other podcast shows from The Entertainment Engine team…

Many music professionals do not have time for unsolicited music submissions. The issue is not just about listening to your music, it is being sure that a song is something they can clear easily — with NO issues down the line!

By Pete Moore

The Entertainment Engine

Keeping readers informed with entertainment news, advice, and guests from Music, Film, and TV

Peter Moore

Written by

Peter has lived New York, Los Angeles and London working in the music, film and TV industries for over three decades helping creators realize their vision.

The Entertainment Engine

We’re providing helpful tips and useful information on navigating the entertainment industry

Peter Moore

Written by

Peter has lived New York, Los Angeles and London working in the music, film and TV industries for over three decades helping creators realize their vision.

The Entertainment Engine

We’re providing helpful tips and useful information on navigating the entertainment industry

Medium is an open platform where 170 million readers come to find insightful and dynamic thinking. Here, expert and undiscovered voices alike dive into the heart of any topic and bring new ideas to the surface. Learn more

Follow the writers, publications, and topics that matter to you, and you’ll see them on your homepage and in your inbox. Explore

If you have a story to tell, knowledge to share, or a perspective to offer — welcome home. It’s easy and free to post your thinking on any topic. Write on Medium

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store