To The Black Women Who Align Themselves With White Supremacy

TaLynn Kel
The Establishment
Published in
7 min readFeb 27, 2017

--

flickr/Domi

You are ignorant and misguided.

TT o the Black women who think that close proximity to or intimacy with whiteness means you are successful . . .

To the Black women who think that supporting anti-Blackness will protect them . . .

To the Black women who speak out against and separate themselves from Black people, consider themselves one of the “good ones,” and think they are protected by the whiteness around them . . .

You are ignorant and misguided.

That hurt, I know. And you might have already stopped reading, but I hope you’ll give me a chance, like I gave your excuse of a rationale for supporting a white supremacist candidate a chance. Stay with me here.

I get why you’d do this. I understand the safety that whiteness represents. The white people public relations campaign proffers a beautifully malevolent message that worms its way into our subconscious and unconscious before we realize it’s happening.

The white people public relations campaign proffers a beautifully malevolent message.

I understand the belief that white equals right. I grew up in this stew of racist patriarchy and I learned to drink my bathwater to survive, just like you. I understand wanting to live in what they tell us is the light. I understand the appeal of manicured lawns, clean streets, and large houses filled with white neighbors, good schools, fancy cars, and infinite consumerism. I understand how these things seem to represent safety and security.

I get how Blackness seems bleak and insecure. I’ve heard the constant messaging from media, institutions, teachers, bosses, comedians, news anchors, authors, and musicians that promote the lies white supremacy tells us. That our dark skin means shady thoughts. That our darkness, our Blackness, is ineptitude, ignorance, and dishonesty. That Black neighborhoods are less safe and secure than white neighborhoods. That Black employees are less capable than white employees. That Black students aren’t as intelligent as white students. That we, Black women, are gold-digging, disease-ridden, baby-making predators constantly seeking…

--

--

TaLynn Kel
The Establishment

Fat, Black, Femme Geek. I’m a writer & cosplayer. My blog is www.talynnkel.com. My books: Breaking Normal& Still Breaking Normal http://amzn.to/2FW5kl3