The Explanation
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The Explanation

God’s Goal — What’s the Point of The Bible Story?

God’s goal, what is it? What is He accomplishing with the Universe, Earth, and Humankind?
God’s goal, what is it? What is He accomplishing with the Universe, Earth, and Humankind?

God’s goal: What’s the point of all these Bible stories? Are they just entertainment, or is there a purpose?

The curtain opens on the next part of our show. The audience hasn’t left, not even for refreshments. They’re still waiting. It’s a live performance, one night only, standing room only. The world premiere of a movie.
(Origin of the Universe, chapter 5.1)

Now we examine God’s goal, the reasons for His actions. What His venture is that He is going to accomplish. The ultimate goal that we can summarize in one sentence. The theme of the Bible — the whole story.

You might be surprised to learn you already know what it is!

Every single human being who has ever walked the face of this earth knows what God’s plan is because it is probably the dearest desire of all human beings — no matter what their race, creed, politics, or religion is. Think about what your deepest desire is.

As we said, our goal is living together in peace and prosperity, as individuals, families, harmonious nations. God wants what you and all people search for and hope for, now and in the future.

Crazy simple, too simple you say, so simple that it’s not even the big revelation you were hoping to understand because it seems so obvious. Well, let me say that the mystery is in the plot of the story.

Onstage, we see a tableau (or freeze frame) of God with the characters of It’s a Small World. God’s goal, living together in prosperity and peace, is as visible as it is invisible in the Creation account at the outset in Genesis. Let’s see it revealed in a context leading up to just one simple verse in Genesis.

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Gen 1:31–2:6

1.31 And God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good. And the evening and the morning were the sixth day.

2 .1 Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them.

2 And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made; and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made.

3 And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.

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If ever there was a laughable, ludicrous, contradictory even ridiculous ‘situation’ describing the great, powerful God, this is it. After all, why does God need to ‘rest?’

Was he in need of a vacation after such a spurt of activity during the previous six days? Why is he resting with the naked Adam and Eve? Is he just too exhausted?

Of course not. According to Isaiah 40:28, He is never tired, ‘He will not grow tired or weary.’

Genesis 2:3 is one of the significant foundational pieces of the puzzle. This verse has been torn to confetti by misinterpretation and miscomprehension. It is unrecognizable. It is the framework for the whole plan of God. Put this masterpiece in the wrong place, or, better yet, eliminate it, and none of the other pieces of the puzzle fit.

Just as this book you’re reading, Origin of the Universe unfolds in a planned way. Each piece follows a well-considered design so that the subsequent parts only make sense in the context of what has gone before. Similarly, this verse from Genesis has stayed constant throughout the many translations and editions of the Bible. However, the translation, while preserving the placement of this critical verse, confounds our understanding.

Straight away, we’ll realize the critical role getting into the Biblical Hebrew is going to play.

We are going to dissect this verse to wring out the proper comprehension. What is the real shape of this masterpiece of our puzzle to which all other pieces are attached? Worldwide understanding by philosophers, scientists, government leaders, and yes, even religious figures can be so helter-skelter.

Galacti points out that they are sincere. They attempt to explain life and how to live in peace and prosperity, and expound on the question, why is it such a mess? They have a great spark inside them — they want to understand.

Galacti suggests a closer study of the masterpiece and the verses that surround it. Why include verses 4–6? Particularly verses 5–6 about no rain and mist watering the ground — it seems disjointed from 1–3. But, it isn’t, it fits in neatly — you have to understand how. Remember, all the pieces of the puzzle fit together and enhance one another.

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Gen 1:31–2:6

1.31 And God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good. And the evening and the morning were the sixth day.

2.1 Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them.

2 And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made; and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made.

3 And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.

4 These were the generations of the heavens and the earth when they were created, in the day that the Lord God made the earth and the heavens,

5 And every plant of the field before it was in the earth, and every herb of the field before it grew: for the Lord God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground.

6 But there went up a mist from the earth, and watered the whole face of the ground.

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These verses cover the sixth and seventh days of the seven-day creation week. Notice here that we’re straddling two chapters, which is the way the King James translators separated this text.

Galacti is mulling over this creation week story: What is the culmination, the high point, the climax of the creation? Is it the appearance of light, the first creative endeavor on the 1st day? Perhaps man and woman in the image of God on the 6th day? Or maybe the 7th day itself, after all, often time events lead to a conclusive pinnacle. Would the 7-day creation week story culminate with humankind and terminate with an anti-climatic event like the 7th day?

Further study:

Yes, you’re going to have to be patient for an answer to this and many other questions. May I suggest you do some personal research. Go to www.UnlockBibleMeaning.com and find Genesis 2.3.

  • Use the Strong’s concordance to look up the Hebrew words for created and made and see the difference.
  • Ask yourself why this repetition in verses 3 and 4? It seems redundant to add made immediately after created.

We’re now getting into the nitty-gritty of Bible meaning, not just Bible reading. We’re going to learn to dig for Bible meaning. The gems are not on the surface; you have to roll up your sleeves and get your hands dirty, so to speak.

  • Regarding the mist watering the ground, is there some enlightenment to be gleaned from this context?
  • Suggestion: look at Deut: 11.10–11 also about watering and its origin.
  • Is there a relationship between the mist watering the ground and created/made?
  • Search for other contexts where we find created/made associated and see what they have to say. (Gen 2.4, Isa 43.7, etc.)
  • Feel free to add your findings to the comments below. I do reserve the privilege of editing comments to maintain the integrity of this website.

This blog post is an excerpt from chapter 5.1 of the book Origin of the Universe

You can read all of the book Origin of the Universe online. Sam blogs weekly at TheExplanation.com The Explanation masters Biblical Hebrew to help you unlock more in-depth Bible meaning. Free tools to read and study the Bible online.

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Sam Kneller

Sam Kneller

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Biblical Hebrew is my passion, the basis of my writing. I ministered & reside in Paris, FR. My books reveal the Bible is a 21st C. handbook. TheExplanation.com