Can a fusion dislocation be good for us?

Paul Tero
The Futurian
Published in
5 min readDec 17, 2021

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THE FUTURIAN #4

Tokomak maintenance, Rswilcox, Creative Commons

Kim was aghast. The events that his grandfather was recounting seemed to be from another time. Another planet even.

For decades it was a technology that did not have a good reputation. After the widely panned Fleischmann and Ponn “breakthrough” in 1989, no scientist of any repute would go near cold fusion. “Junk science” they said.

Until this incident, cold fusion was held to be the miracle energy source. Unlike nuclear fission with its lethal waste products and nuclear fusion with its high energy requirements, cold fusion was theorised to be a room-temperature nuclear reaction of unlimited potential.

As the technology of quantum computing matured in the late 2020s various threads came together. For this now mature technology was able to very quickly process the physical world as it is — at the atomic and subatomic level — as opposed to the relatively slow representations of the real world afforded by classical computers. And these combining quantum-related threads opened up a scientific door to new and precise calculations of the very essence of nature itself.

Threads that ultimately influenced two types of fusion research. For cold fusion, it meant that scientists in labs around the world, using acceptable program names such as “Low Energy Nuclear Reactions” or “Condensed Matter Nuclear Science”, could turn theories into successful peer-reviewed experiments. For those researching nuclear fusion, it meant that the effort being poured into the famous ITER Tokamak produced commercially viable products.

Kim was proud of his grandfather. Although he wasn’t exactly sure of the official title he once had, he knew that in the years prior to his retirement he seemed to be in charge of building the city he lived in. Kim knew that his mother’s dad was a kind man. That he had a background in some form of engineering and that he wasn’t the stuffy type — it was fun having him around his own friends. This slice of history, this sequence of events that his dear grandfather was walking him through, about this now-familiar power source, was at once both fascinating and yet so old fashioned.

By 2030 what were called “Cold Cubes” were seemingly everywhere. Although some called them “Stark Hearts” after…

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Paul Tero
The Futurian

Futurist, International Educator, Speaker and PhD Candidate (researching the “industries of the future”). More at https://delliumadvisory.biz