Impact of climate chaos on coffee

Keith Parkins
Apr 15, 2017 · 4 min read
the warm, eloquent, hard working human being who grows your coffee, Mount Elgon, eastern Uganda / Phil Adams

Konrad Brits, CEO of Falcon Coffees, speculated to me that the blankets of coffee covering the mountains will quickly dwindle to a few, high-altitude islands. He foresees a not too distant future in which high quality coffee is the preserve of billionaire oligarchs. There was irony in that statement, given that many of those same oligarchs have vested financial or political interests in climate change denial, but there was barely a trace of hyperbole.

In the Rwenzori Mountains, which form the border with the Democratic Republic of Congo in the west, leaf rust is affecting coffee trees at greater altitudes every year. This insidious progression doesn’t make for dramatic time-lapse images like a receding glacier but it is every bit as real, and its implications are every bit as profound.

The Little Bicycle Coffee Shop

Musings on all things coffee and occasionally tea

Keith Parkins

Written by

Writer, thinker, deep ecologist, social commentator, activist, enjoys music, literature and good food.

The Little Bicycle Coffee Shop

Musings on all things coffee and occasionally tea