Isolated Socialization

A visit to nature reminds us that we’re never alone, even in the big bad lonely city.

Los Angeles is notorious for its isolationism. We move around alone in metal boxes, surrounded by millions of people moving around in their own metal boxes. We sit in rooms staring at white screens, at coffee shops staring at slightly bigger screens, at home staring at even larger screens, surrounded by millions of people in their own rooms staring at their own screens.

the view of our home from the deep backyard

Up in the San Gabriels though, we disconnect from all that, and disconnection gives us the chance to reconnect with each other. Hiking and camping are inherently social, whether you’re walking up that mountain with friends or if you’re walking it alone and saying “howdy” to hiker-bys.

a strangely isolated place.

Nature is a protected space of isolated socialization. We find connection in nature because it’s a reconnection to our roots. In those quietly wild moments, we remember that whether we see it every day or not, we’re all hurtling through the universe on the same blue dot.

The most beautiful part? You can take that realization back with you to the city, so the next time your in your metal box on the traffic-jammed freeway, maybe you don’t get so stressed. The next time you’re out in public staring at your screen, maybe you remember to look up at the world around you more often.

It’s the realization is that we’re all in this together, and that realization is the rediscovery peace.

Inspiration Point in the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument

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**Urban Disconnection is a project of the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument/Angeles National Forest Artist in Residence program, with the goal of inspiring Angelenos to explore, enjoy, and protect our majestic backyard.

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