Most of My Life I Was Unhappy

I spent most of my younger life very unhappy. Actually from the age of ten until twenty-five I was miserable and then from about 25 to 45 I was hopelessly searching for why I was so unhappy and what had gone wrong. I was an intelligent guy, brought up by a nice family, and I was unable to explain or fix why I was unhappy.

At a very early age, I had gone from being a happy, positive kid to a very angry, bored, and resentful boy, then teenager and finally an adult. Because of a series of losses at a young age and then more losses in my teen years and more disappointments as a young man, I got stuck in seeing life as something that was happening to me, rather than because of me.

I lost my dad at ten years of age and my older brother at 20. Add to that all the other losses and failures a person naturally accumulates through life and it’s easy to see how a person can become bitter and resentful.

I was stuck in the past and nothing got better for me.

Then one day I heard someone say, “life isn’t about what has happened, it’s about what you make happen.” For the first time I felt empowered and in control. I couldn’t shake this idea from my head. A simple idea that my future was more important than my past.

“Life isn’t about what has happened, it’s about what you make happen.”

This slight shift allowed me to start to create my life rather than being a mere spectator of it. So, if you have spent any part of your life unhappy, it doesn’t have to stay like that.

The things I did right was; 1) I never quit looking, 2) I would not allow myself to be medicated even though it was recommended many times, 3) I refused to settle for anything short of what I knew I deserved, and 4) once I found something that worked for me I defended it with my life (but that I will save for another article.)

Keep searching, pay attention to those that are happy and never quit looking for what you deserve, I am confident you will find yours.

Let me know if this helps,

Grant Cardone

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