The Privilege of Being “Anti-War”

You can’t call for Intifada and be anti-war at the same time

Mallory Mosner
The Panopticon

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Image from cottonbro studio on Pexels

No one “likes” war. Well, maybe the CEO of Lockheed Martin does, but aside from a few rare examples like that, saying you love and desire war is like in Nacho Libre when Esqueleto says he hates orphans — it’s a laughably absurd repudiation of universal human values.

And yet, while we can eternally debate about the degree to which it is human nature or fabrication, war has been a widespread reality of the human experience for tens of thousands of years. There is almost no corner of this globe that it has spared, and despite political tendencies to romanticize certain groups of people as having been fundamentally peaceful, most groups of people across time and space have also at some point participated in violent warfare.

The chronic existence of war obviously does not mean that it is “good” or even always (or usually) necessary. And yet, as the ironic cries of those “anti-war” protesters calling for a “permanent ceasefire” in the Israel-Hamas war while calling for Intifada “by any means necessary” demonstrate, the potential of organized violence in forcibly shifting history and culture remains a captivating prospect.

When I was entrenched in activist spaces, any justification of the “military-industrial complex”…

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Mallory Mosner
The Panopticon

Queer non-binary (they/she) Jewish writer and Ayurvedic Health Counselor who loves puzzles, cats and meditation.