Updated: All books we have ever recommended on PM Library (271 books)

Alexander Hipp
Dec 21, 2018 · 105 min read

From essentials to inspirational books about product management, AI, leadership, design and collaboration.

Latest update 16th May 2020

Our overview of all the books we have recommended in The PM Library ever (chronologically)


Inspired

Why read?

Chapter 33 tackles the topic on Product Discovery in great detail.

368 pages, John Wiley & Sons 2018

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Build Better Products

Why read?

368 pages, Rosenfeld Media 2016

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Change By Design

Why read?

In this book, Tim Brown reintroduces design thinking, the collaborative process by which the designer’s sensibilities and methods are employed to match people’s needs with what is technically feasible and a viable business strategy. In short, design thinking converts need into demand. It’s a human-centered approach to problem-solving that helps people and organizations become more innovative and creative.

Change by Design is not a book by designers for designers; it is a book for creative leaders seeking to infuse design thinking into every level of an organization, product, or service to drive new alternatives for business and society.

272 pages, Harper Business 2009

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Sprint

Why read?

Entrepreneurs and leaders face big questions every day: What’s the most important place to focus your effort, and how do you start? What will your idea look like in real life? How many meetings and discussions does it take before you can be sure you have the right solution?
A practical guide to answering critical business questions, Sprint is a book for teams of any size, from small startups to Fortune 100s, from teachers to nonprofits. It’s for anyone with a big opportunity, problem, or idea who needs to get answers today.

288 pages, Simon & Schuster 2016

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The Lean Startup

Why read?

Rather than wasting time creating elaborate business plans, The Lean Startup offers entrepreneurs — in companies of all sizes — a way to test their vision continuously, to adapt and adjust before it’s too late. Ries provides a scientific approach to creating and managing successful startups in an age when companies need to innovate more than ever.

338 pages, Currency 2011

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What Customers Want

Why read?

256 pages, McGraw-Hill Education 2005

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The Four Steps to the Epiphany

Why read?

384 pages, Wiley 2020

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The Lean Product Playbook

Why read?

336 pages, Wiley 2015

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Escaping the Build Trap

Why read?

In this book, Melissa — CEO of Product Labs and founder of the Product Institute — helps you to identify whether you are caught in the “build trap” and more importantly, gives you practical advice how to escape it. She brings together her year-long experience of building products and deep knowledge of how product-lead organisations work.

200 pages, O’Reilly Media 2018

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Intercom on Jobs-To-Be-Done

Why read?

51 Pages, Intercom 2017

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Competing Against Luck

Why read?

This book carefully lays down the authors’ provocative framework, providing a comprehensive explanation of the theory and why it is predictive, how to use it in the real world — and, most importantly, how not to squander the insights it provides.

288 pages, Harper Business 2016

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The Jobs To Be Done Playbook

Why read?

The Jobs To Be Done Playbook helps organizations turn market insight into action. This book shows you techniques to make offerings people want, as well as make people want your offering.

300 pages, Two Waves Books 2020

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Jobs to be Done

Why read?

Since 1991, Tony Ulwick has pioneered an innovation process that answers these questions. In 1999, Tony introduced Clayton Christensen to the idea that “people have underlying needs or processes in their lives, that they are addressing in some way right now” — an insight that was to become Jobs-to-be-Done Theory.

202 pages, Idea Bite Press 2016

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When Coffee and Kale Compete

Why read?

227 pages, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform 2018

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Jobs to Be Done

Why read?

First popularized by Clayton Christensen, the Jobs to be Done theory argues that people purchase products and services to solve a specific problem. They’re not buying ice cream, for example, but celebration, bonding, and indulgence.

224 pages, AMACOM 2016

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The Jobs-to-be-Done Handbook

Why read?

66 pages, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform 2014

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Dare to Lead

Why read?

Four-time #1 New York Times bestselling author Brené Brown has spent the past two decades studying the emotions and experiences that give meaning to our lives, and the past seven years working with transformative leaders and teams spanning the globe. She found that leaders in organizations ranging from small entrepreneurial startups and family-owned businesses to nonprofits, civic organizations, and Fortune 50 companies all ask the same question:

How do you cultivate braver, more daring leaders, and how do you embed the value of courage in your culture?

400 pages, Random House Large Print 2019

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Leadershift

Why read?

Change is so rapid today that leaders must do much more than stay the course to be successful. If they aren’t nimble and ready to adapt, they won’t survive. The key is to learn how to leadershift.

In Leadershift, John C. Maxwell helps leaders gain the ability and willingness to make leadership changes that will positively enhance their organizational and personal growth. He does this by sharing the eleven shifts he made over the course of his long and successful leadership career.

288 pages, HarperCollins Leadership 2019

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The Coaching Habit

Why read?

But what if managers could coach their people in 10 minutes or less?

227 pages, Bertrams Print on Demand 2006

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Trillion Dollar Coach

Why read?

Bill Campbell played an instrumental role in the growth of several prominent companies, such as Google, Apple, and Intuit, fostering deep relationships with Silicon Valley visionaries, including Steve Jobs, Larry Page, and Eric Schmidt. In addition, this business genius mentored dozens of other important leaders throughout USA, from entrepreneurs to venture capitalists to educators to football players, leaving behind a legacy of growing companies, successful people, respect, friendship, and love after his death in 2016.

240 pages, Harper Business 2019

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Leadership is an Art

Why read?

De Pree looks at leadership as a kind of stewardship, stressing the importance of building relationships, initiating ideas, and creating a lasting value system within an organization. Rather than focusing on the “hows” of corporate life, he explains the “whys.” He shows that the first responsibility of a leader is to define reality and the last is to say thank you.

148 pages, Currency 2004

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The Making of a Manager

Why read?

· Don’t hide thorny problems from your own manager; you’re better off seeking help quickly and honestly
· Before you fire someone for failure to collaborate, figure out if the problem is temperamental or just a lack of training or coaching
· Don’t offer critical feedback in a ‘compliment sandwich’ — there’s a better way!

Whether you’re new to the job, a veteran leader, or looking to be promoted, this is the handbook you need to be the kind of manager you’ve always wanted.

274 pages, Virgin Digital 2019

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Death by Meeting

Why read?

Then an unlikely advisor, Will Peterson, enters Casey’s world. When he proposes an unconventional, even radical, approach to solving the meeting problem, Casey is just desperate enough to listen.

As in his other books, Lencioni provides a framework for his groundbreaking model, and makes it applicable to the real world. Death by Meeting is nothing short of a blueprint for leaders who want to eliminate waste and frustration among their teams, and create environments of engagement and passion.

272 pages, Jossey-Bass 2004

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The Vision Driven Leader

Why read?

256 pages, Baker Books 2020

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How to Lead When You’re Not in Charge

Why read?

240 pages, Zondervan 2017

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Disruptive Leadership

Why read?

190 pages, Productivity Press 2017

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The Five Dysfunctions of a Team

Why read?

229 pages, Jossey-Bass 2002

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Radical Candor

Why read?

The idea is simple: You don’t have to choose between being a pushover and a jerk. Using Radical Candor―avoiding the perils of Obnoxious Aggression, Manipulative Insincerity, and Ruinous Empathy―you can be kind and clear at the same time.
Kim Scott was a highly successful leader at Google before decamping to Apple, where she developed and taught a management class. Since the original publication of Radical Candor in 2017, Scott has earned international fame with her vital approach to effective leadership and co-founded the Radical Candor executive education company, which helps companies put the book’s philosophy into practice.

272 pages, St. Martin’s Press 2017

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Start with Why

Why read?

256 pages, Portfolio 2011

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Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader

Why read?

200 pages, Harvard Business Review Press 2015

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The Team That Managed Itself

Why read?

Learn to lead the team along with Allie as she tackles one challenge after another while the clock ticks down. How do you build the right team and choose the goals to pull them to greatness, even if you’re dealing with a toxic environment? How do you keep your people moving in the right direction without burning out or burning it all down? As Allie finds out, even in the face of overwhelming pressure it’s about setting expectations, giving good feedback, checking in against goals, and learning as a team…

268 pages, Cucina Media, LLC 2019

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Forever Employable

Why read?

Using the timeline from his own career and anecdotes, stories, and case studies from other successful recognized experts, Jeff provides a step-by-step guide to building a foundation based on your current expertise, ensuring that no matter what happens in your industry you’ll remain forever employable.

77 pages, Gothelf Corp 2020

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BrandingPays

Why read?

Karen Kang is a recognized brand strategist, and also the CEO and founder of a personal branding company, BrandingPays. So, you can feel confident that she knows what she’s talking about.

208 pages, BrandingPays Media 2013

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Rise of the Youpreneur

Why read?

A Youpreneur transcends the old rules of business and builds a sustainable business from the foundation of their experience, interests, and personality — their personal brand. Youpreneurs draw an engaged, loyal audience even as they pursue varying, changing interests. They play by their own rules, and they reap the benefits.

In this book, Chris Ducker shows us how we can build our own personal brand, build the ‘Business of You’, and become a Youpreneur.

288 pages, 4C Press 2018

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Platform

Why read?

Anyone who wonders how their favourite influencers found their voices and built their audiences, will find the answers here and discover that the process is technical, creative, tactical, and much easier than they might have expected.

224 pages, Lorena Jones Books 2019

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Digital You

Why read?

Willian Arruda, in his book Digital You, describes modern world of personal branding and helps you to define, express, and expand your personal brand for the virtual world. Branding is not about being famous, Arruda explains; it’s about being selectively famous. When you understand the true value of personal branding, you can use it as a serious career development strategy.

150 pages, Association for Talent Development 2019

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Reinventing You

Why read?

Dorie Clark fills this book with personal stories mixed with interviews and examples from other prominent names, such as Al Gore, Tim Ferriss, and Seth Godin.

240 pages, Harvard Business Review Press 2017

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Introduction to Personal Branding

Why read?

These actionable steps include advice on how to take the perfect profile photo, how to think about your professional purpose, how to optimize your LinkedIn profile, how to optimize your social media presence for search engines like Google and Bing, how to craft a personal branding statement, how to analyze your competitors across social media so you can make your brand differentiate from theirs and how to be social by design.

65 pages, Delightful Communications 2016

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Hacking Growth

Why read?

Hacking Growth focuses on customers — how to attain them, retain them, engage them, and monetize them — rather than product.

320 pages, Virgin Books 2017

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Traction

Why read?

Building a successful company is hard. Smart entrepreneurs know that the key to success isn’t the originality of your offering, the brilliance of your team, or how much money you raise. It’s how consistently you can grow and acquire new customers.

Traction will teach you the nineteen channels you can use to build a customer base, and offers a three-step framework to figure out which ones will work best for your business

240 pages, Portfolio Penguin 2015

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Growth Hacker Marketing

Why read?

Some of the biggest tech companies don’t spend a dime on traditional marketing. No press releases, no TV commercials, no billboards. Instead, they rely on growth hacking to reach many more people, despite modest marketing budgets.

In Growth Hacker Marketing, Ryan Holiday shares his experience, teaching you how to harness the power of growth to propel you to success. Featuring insights from leading growth hackers, Growth Hacker Marketing is the essential guide to the revolutionary new approach to growing your business.

142 pages, Profile Books 2014

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Growth Hacking

Why read?

The growth hacking framework delivered in this book is an easy to understand growth marketing blueprint that empowers any business to apply growth hacking.

204 pages, Lioncrest Publishing 2017

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The Growth Hacker’s Guide to the Galaxy

Why read?

Intended to be as actionable as possible, inside you’ll find some no-nonsense, concrete tips that you can take and use right away.

270 pages, Insurgent Publishing 2016

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Explosive Growth

Why read?

This book strikes the right balance between entertaining, and educational, and is widely regarded as a must-have book for growth hacking.

306 pages, Clifford Ventures Corporation 2017

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The Growth Marketer’s Playbook

Why read?

This book will show you the growth processes used by many current VC-backed businesses, so you can learn and emulate their techniques. Jim also shares some of the most common mistakes that businesses make, so you can take care to avoid the common pitfalls, and increase your chances of success.

158 pages, CreateSpace Independent Publishing 2018

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The Jobs To Be Done Playbook

Why read?

The Jobs To Be Done Playbook (JTBD) helps organizations turn market insight into action. This book shows you techniques to make offerings people want, as well as make people want your offering.

Two Waves Books 2020

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The Catalyst

Why read?

Everyone has something they want to change. Marketers want to change their customers’ minds and leaders want to change organizations. Start-ups want to change industries and nonprofits want to change the world. But change is hard. Often, we persuade and pressure and push, but nothing moves. Could there be a better way?

This book is designed for anyone who wants to catalyze change. It provides a powerful way of thinking and a range of techniques that can lead to extraordinary results. Whether you’re trying to change one person, transform an organization, or shift the way an entire industry does business, this book will teach you how to become a catalyst.

288 pages, Simon & Schuster 2020

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No Filter

Why read?

In 2010, Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger released a photo-sharing app called Instagram, with one simple but irresistible feature: it would make anything you captured through your phone look more beautiful. The cofounders started to cultivate a community of photographers and artisans around the app, but it quickly went mainstream.
At its heart, No Filter is a human story, as Sarah Frier uncovers how the company’s decisions have fundamentally changed how we interact with the world around us. Frier examines how Instagram’s dominance acts as lens into our society today, highlighting our fraught relationship with technology, our desire for perfection, and the battle within tech for its most valuable commodity: our attention.

352 pages, Simon & Schuster 2020

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No Rules Rules

Why read?

Drawing on hundreds of interviews with current and past Netflix employees from around the globe and never-before-told stories of trial and error from Hastings’s own career, No Rules Rules is the fascinating and untold account of the philosophy behind one of the world’s most innovative, imaginative, and successful companies.

320 pages, Penguin Press 2020

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Upstream

Why read?

So often in life, we get stuck in a cycle of response. We put out fires. We deal with emergencies. We stay downstream, handling one problem after another, but we never make our way upstream to fix the systems that caused the problems.
Upstream delivers practical solutions for preventing problems rather than reacting to them. How many problems in our lives and in society are we tolerating simply because we’ve forgotten that we can fix them?

220 pages, Avid Reader Press / Simon & Schuster 2020

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Samsung Rising

Why read?

416 pages, Currency 2020

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The Manager’s Path

Why read?

Managing a technical team, as you may well know, is a special practice, and requires more than a normal management role. This books is your companion every step of the way.

244 pages, O’Reilly Media 2017

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Managing Humans

Why read?

This book is full of stories based on companies in the Silicon Valley where people have been known to yell at each other and occasionally throw chairs. Whether you’re an aspiring manager, a current manager, or just wondering what manager does all day, there is a story in this book that will speak to you.

348 pages, Apress 2016

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The Unicorn Project

Why read?

This book is a must read for anyone navigating a tech company, as an engineer or especially as a leader. Or any other role, for that matter.

352 pages, IT Revolution Press, 2019

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Managing the Unmanageable

Why read?

All too often, software development is deemed unmanageable. How can this be? Authors Mickey W. Mantle and Ron Lichty pose that you need to begin by understanding your people. This is the book to help you do that.

452 Pages, Addison-Wesley Professional, 2012

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97 Things Every Engineering Manager Should Know

Why read?

From the same author as The Managers Path, Camille Fournier draws upon her deep experience as a technical leader and manager at different levels, to bring you insights and actionable advice to improve as a leader.

296 pages, O’Reilly Media 2019

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Team Topologies

Why read?

As a technical leader, being able to observe, assess, measure and manage the basic functions of our team is critical to your success, and the success of the team. This book is a critical handbook to get you started.

240 pages, It Revolution Press, 2019

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Predictably Irrational

Why read?

400 pages, Harper 2009

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Blink

Why read?

Blink reveals that great decision makers aren’t those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of “thin-slicing”-filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.

206 pages, Back Bay Books pages 2007

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Principles

Why read?

592 pages, Simon & Schuster 2017

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Thinking, Fast and Slow

Why read?

512 pages, Farrar, Straus and Giroux 2011

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Factfulness

Why read?

It turns out that the world, for all its imperfections, is in a much better state than we might think. That doesn’t mean there aren’t real concerns. But when we worry about everything all the time instead of embracing a worldview based on facts, we can lose our ability to focus on the things that threaten us most.
Inspiring and revelatory, filled with lively anecdotes and moving stories, Factfulness is an urgent and essential book that will change the way you see the world and empower you to respond to the crises and opportunities of the future.

352 pages, Flatiron Books 2018

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Behave

Why read?

Sapolsky’s storytelling concept is delightful but it also has a powerful intrinsic logic: he starts by looking at the factors that bear on a person’s reaction in the precise moment a behavior occurs, and then hops back in time from there, in stages, ultimately ending up at the deep history of our species and its evolutionary legacy.

800 pages, Penguin Press 2017

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Misbehaving

Why read?

Traditional economics assumes rational actors. Early in his research, Thaler realized these Spock-like automatons were nothing like real people. Whether buying a clock radio, selling basketball tickets, or applying for a mortgage, we all succumb to biases and make decisions that deviate from the standards of rationality assumed by economists.
Laced with antic stories of Thaler’s spirited battles with the bastions of traditional economic thinking, Misbehaving is a singular look into profound human foibles. When economics meets psychology, the implications for individuals, managers, and policy makers are both profound and entertaining.

342 pages, W. W. Norton & Company 2016

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The Art of Choosing

Why read?

Whether mundane or life-altering, these choices define us and shape our lives. Sheena Iyengar asks the difficult questions about how and why we choose: Is the desire for choice innate or bound by culture? Why do we sometimes choose against our best interests? How much control do we really have over what we choose? Sheena Iyengar’s award-winning research reveals that the answers are surprising and profound. In our world of shifting political and cultural forces, technological revolution, and interconnected commerce, our decisions have far-reaching consequences.

368 pages, Twelve 2011

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Basic Economics

Why read?

704 pages, Basic Books 2014

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Naked Economics

Why read?

400 pages, W. W. Norton & Company 2019

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The Value of Everything

Why read?

384 pages, Penguin 2019

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Built to Last

Why read?

368 pages, Harper Business 2004

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Blue Ocean Strategy, Expanded Edition

Why read?

320 pages, Harvard Business Review Press 2015

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Economic Facts and Fallacies

Why read?

Sowell shows that fallacies are not simply crazy ideas but in fact have a certain plausibility that gives them their staying power — and makes careful examination of their flaws both necessary and important.

304 pages, Basic Books 2011

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Zero to One

Why read?

Zero to One is about how to build companies that create new things. It draws on everything Peter Thiel has learned directly as a co-founder of PayPal and Palantir and then an investor in hundreds of startups, including Facebook and SpaceX. The single most powerful pattern Thiel has noticed is that successful people find value in unexpected places, and they do this by thinking about business from first principles instead of formulas. Ask not, what would Mark do? Ask: What valuable company is nobody building?

224 pages, Currency 2014

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The Great Fragmentation

Why read?

As the world moves from the industrial era to the digital age, power is shifting and fragmenting. Power is no longer about might and ownership ― power in a digital world is about access.

This book discusses the history of work since the industrial revolution, and draws a clear trend that leads us into the future. Many of the changes mentioned in the book are already being realised. This is a must-read!

288 pages, Wiley 2014

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Rise of the Robots

Why read?

Artificial intelligence is already well on its way to making “good jobs” obsolete: many paralegals, journalists, office workers, and even computer programmers are poised to be replaced by robots and smart software. As progress continues, blue and white-collar jobs alike will evaporate, squeezing working- and middle-class families ever further.

Rise of the Robots is essential reading to understand what accelerating technology means for our economic prospects and for society as a whole.

368 pages, Basic Books 2016

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Superintelligence

Why read?

Superintelligence asks the questions: What happens when machines surpass humans in general intelligence? Will artificial agents save or destroy us? Nick Bostrom lays the foundation for understanding the future of humanity and intelligent life.

390 pages, Oxford University Press 2016

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It Doesn’t Have to Be Crazy at Work

Why read?

Sadly, this isn’t just a problem for large organizations — individuals, contractors, and solopreneurs are burning themselves out the same way. The answer to better productivity isn’t more hours — it’s less waste and fewer things that induce distraction and persistent stress.

The authors have a notorious and impressive track record of running a successful multi-million dollar SaaS business, and also publishing fantastic books. So, take that as a sign that this one should find a place on your shelf.

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Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?

Why read?

Linchpin digs deep into uncomfortable territory, but ultimately provides a brightly valuable perspective on work and career. Do you want to be replaceable? Or do you want to be a linchpin?

Linchpin is about becoming indispensable at work and breaking out of the scape of following the instruction manual.

This is an important read for anyone, and just as relevant for ‘right now’ as ‘the future’.

256 pages, Piatkus Books 2012

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Gigged

Why read?

In the tradition of the great business narratives of our time, Gigged offers deeply-sourced, up-close-and-personal accounts of our new economy. Journalist Sarah Kessler follows a wide range of individuals from across the country to provide a nuanced look at how the gig economy is playing out in real-time.

Kessler wades through the hype and hyperbole to tackle the big questions: What does the future of work look like? Will the millennial generation do as well as their parents? How can we all find meaningful, well-paid work?

288 pages, St. Martin’s Press 2018

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The Future of Work

Why read?

The Future of Work digs in to the dynamic of employers and employees, managers and leaders, and explores how we need to begin to view these relationships into the future.

Reading this book will help you to think more critically about how you structure your teams and your business, and how professional relationships will begin to transform.

256 pages, Wiley 2014

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The Little Book of Beyond Budgeting

Why read?

Budgeting and business accounting is certainly one of those areas. Who thinks about it these days? Well, as it turns out, as businesses become more agile, the whole suite of business processes need to be redesigned too, including accounting.

The Little Book of Beyond Budgeting is an accountant-cum-entrepreneur’s handbook to help entrepreneurs navigate this very topic.

This small but serious handbook fills in the gaps in awareness and understanding by answering the question what is Beyond Budgeting? in a clear and succinct way to help managers make informed choices about business processes, as an alternative to blindly copying what has always been done before.

90 pages, Troubador Publishing Ltd 2017

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Human Centered Design Toolkit

Why read?

Over 150,000 copies of this book have been bought or downloaded by designers, entrepreneurs and innovators, just like you.

IDEO is certainly an authority on Design Thinking, and so this book is a natural choice to include in the collection. The toolkit offered in this book puts people back in the focus and pushes us to think about the person instead of the (perceived problem).

192 pages, IDEO 2009

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The Design Of Business

Why read?

Roger Martin introduces the idea of a knowledge funnel as the process for businesses to innovate and solve problems.

He also poses that there are two main types of business thinking: analytical thinking, and intuitive thinking. Analytical thinking has gradually become more prevalent because it’s easier to measure. But, intuitive thinking has its place too.

208 Pages, Harvard Business Review Press; Third Edition edition 2009

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The Moment of Clarity

Why read?

But the authors chart a way forward. Using theories and tools from the human sciences — anthropology, sociology, philosophy, and psychology — The Moment of Clarity introduces a practical framework called sensemaking. Sensemaking’s nonlinear problem-solving approach gives executives a better way to understand business challenges involving shifts in human behaviour.

224 pages, Harvard Business Review Press 2014

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Hidden in Plain Sight

Why read?

Not strictly focused on Design Thinking practices, but very much focused on exactly what drives consumers to make the choices they do, and demonstrates how all types of businesses can learn to see what is hidden in plain sight today, to create businesses tomorrow.

Jan Chipchase, named by Fortune as “one of the 50 smartest people in tech,” has travelled the world, studying people of all nations and their habits, paying attention to the ordinary things that we do every day and how they affect our buying decisions.

256 pages, Harper Business 2013

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The Art of Innovation

Why read?

IDEO doesn’t buy into the myth of the lone genius working away in isolation, waiting for great ideas to strike. Kelley believes everyone can be creative, and the goal at his firm is to tap into that wellspring of creativity in order to make innovation a way of life.

320 pages, Currency 2001

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Design Thinking for Strategic Innovation

Why read?

It explains how design thinking can bring about creative solutions to solve complex business problems. Organized into five sections, this book provides an introduction to the values and applications of design thinking, explains design thinking approaches for eight key challenges that most businesses face, and offers an application framework for these business challenges through exercises, activities, and resources.

224 pages, Wiley 2013

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Testing Business Ideas

Why read?

368 pages, Wiley 2019

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How to Speak Machine

Why read?

How to Speak Machine provides a coherent framework for today’s product designers, business leaders, and policymakers to grasp this brave new world. Drawing on his wide-ranging experience from engineering to computer science to design, Maeda shows how businesses and individuals can identify opportunities afforded by technology to make world-changing and inclusive products — while avoiding the pitfalls inherent to the medium.

240 pages, Portfolio 2019

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What You Do Is Who You Are

Why read?

What You Do Is Who You Are is a journey through culture, from ancient to modern. Along the way, it answers a question fundamental to any organization: Who are we? How do people talk about us when we’re not around? How do we treat our customers? Are we there for people in a pinch? Can we be trusted?

288 pages, Harper Business 2019

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Shape Up

Why read?

Get the first version of this book, here:

Print, e-book, and audio versions will come next. Join the newsletter to hear when they’re available.


Range

Why read?

David Epstein examined the world’s most successful athletes, artists, musicians, inventors, forecasters and scientists. He discovered that in most fields — especially those that are complex and unpredictable — generalists, not specialists, are primed to excel. Generalists often find their path late, and they juggle many interests rather than focusing on one. They’re also more creative, more agile, and able to make connections their more specialized peers can’t see.

352 pages, Riverhead Books 2019

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Nine Lies About Work

Why read?

These may sound like basic truths of our work lives today. But actually, they’re lies. As strengths guru and bestselling author Marcus Buckingham and Cisco Leadership and Team Intelligence head Ashley Goodall show in this provocative, inspiring book, there are some big lies — distortions, faulty assumptions, wrong thinking — that we encounter every time we show up for work. Nine lies, to be exact.

This book leads to some free thinking about the way we do our jobs and how we can approach what we do in a different way.

256 pages, Harvard Business Review Press 2019

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Loonshots

Why read?

In Loonshots, physicist and entrepreneur Safi Bahcall reveals a surprising new way of thinking about the mysteries of group behavior that challenges everything we thought we knew about nurturing radical breakthroughs.

Drawing on the science of phase transitions, Bahcall shows why teams, companies, or any group with a mission will suddenly change from embracing wild new ideas to rigidly rejecting them, just as flowing water will suddenly change into brittle ice. Mountains of print have been written about culture. Loonshots identifies the small shifts in structure that control this transition, the same way that temperature controls the change from water to ice.

368 pages, St. Martin’s Press 2019

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Design for How People Think

Why read?

Corporate leaders, marketers, product owners, and designers will learn how cognitive processes from different brain regions form what we perceive as a singular experience. Author John Whalen shows you how anyone on your team can conduct “contextual interviews” to unlock insights. You’ll then learn how to apply that knowledge to design brilliant experiences for your customers.

240 pages, O’Reilly Media 2019

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Outcomes Over Output

Why read?

76 pages, Independently published 2019

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Talking to Strangers

Why read?

Something is very wrong, Gladwell argues, with the tools and strategies we use to make sense of people we don’t know. And because we don’t know how to talk to strangers, we are inviting conflict and misunderstanding in ways that have a profound effect on our lives and our world.

Gladwell brilliantly argues that we should stop assuming, realize no one’s transparent and understand that behavior is tied to unseen circumstances.

400 pages, Little, Brown and Company 2019

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Lean Analytics

Gregor Meyenberg — Head of Product at Event Inc says

More book recommendations by Gregor Meyenberg

440 pages, O’Reilly Media 2013

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Running Lean

Florian Gansemer — Managing Director at kununu engage says

More book recommendations by Florian Gansemer

240 pages, O’Reilly Media 2012

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The Lean Entrepreneur

Clement Kao — Product Manager at Blend says

“A sprawling overview of some of the biggest ideas in the start-up world.”
— Seth Godin (Author The Icarus Deception)

More book recommendations by Clement Kao

224 pages, Wiley 2016

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The Principles of Product Development Flow

Barry O’Reilly — Author, Speaker and Founder says

More book recommendations by Barry O’Reilly

304 pages, Wiley 2009

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Treasure Roadmap

Opinion by the author

More book recommendations by Momčilo Dakić

163 pages, Amazon Digital Services LLC 2019

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Validating Product Ideas

Christian Becker — Founder of leanproductable says

More book recommendations by Christian Becker

344 pages, Rosenfeld 2016

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The Ride of a Lifetime

Why read?

272 pages, Random House 2019

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The Man Who Solved the Market

Why read?

384 pages, Portfolio 2019

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Bad Blood

Why read?

352 pages, Knopf 2018

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Outliers

In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of “outliers” — the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different?

336 pages, Back Bay Books 2011

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Creativity, Inc.

Why read?

368 pages, Bantam Press 2014

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Read more about the braintrust


Billion Dollar Whale

Why read?

416 pages, Hachette Books 2019

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Indistractable

Why read?

Eyal lays bare the secret of finally doing what you say you will do with a four-step, research-backed model. Indistractable reveals the key to getting the best out of technology, without letting it get the best of us.

300 pages, BenBella Books 2019

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Essentialism

Why read?

272 pages, Currency 2014

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The Productivity Project

Why read?

The Productivity Project — and the lessons Chris learned — are the result of that year-long journey. Among the counterintuitive insights Chris Bailey will teach you:
· slowing down to work more deliberately;
· shrinking or eliminating the unimportant;
· the rule of three;
· striving for imperfection;
· scheduling less time for important tasks;
· the 20-second rule to distract yourself from the inevitable distractions;
· and the concept of productive procrastination.

304 pages, Currency 2017

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Deep Work

Who should read this book?

Deep work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It’s a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time. Deep work will make you better at what you do and provide the sense of true fulfillment that comes from craftsmanship. In short, deep work is like a super power in our increasingly competitive twenty-first century economy.

304 pages, Grand Central Publishing 2016

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The Bullet Journal Method

Why read?

* Track the past: Using nothing more than a pen and paper, create a clear and comprehensive record of your thoughts.

* Order the present: Find daily calm by tackling your to-do list in a more mindful, systematic, and productive way.

* Design the future: Transform your vague curiosities into meaningful goals, and then break those goals into manageable action steps that lead to big change.

320 pages, Portfolio 2018

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Extreme Productivity

Why read?

304 pages, HarperBusiness 2012

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Getting Things Done

Why read?

352 pages, Penguin Books 2015

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Antifragile

Why read?

544 pages, Incerto 2014

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The EQ Interview

Why read?

192 pages, Amacom 2008

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Pixels and Place

Why read?

“Kate O’Neill’s Pixels and Place is a must read for those of us fascinated by the tidal shift taking place around us in the way we envision the world and our experiences within it.”
— Mitch Lowe, Founding executive of Netflix

224 pages, KO Insights 2016

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Tech Humanist

Why read?

267 pages, Independently 2018

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Product Roadmaps Relaunched

Why read?

272 pages, O’Reilly Media 2017

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Product Research Rules

Why pre-order?


Super Thinking

Why read?

352 pages, Portfolio 2019

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Analog In, Digital Out

Why read?

336 pages, New Riders 2006

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Understanding Design Thinking, Lean, and Agile

Why read?

“While powerful concepts, Design Thinking, Lean, and Agile are heavily misunderstood. Jonny elegantly breaks down the real meaning behind these terms, and tells you how they can be used effectively to create great products. It’s a must read for every organization.”
— Melissa Perri (Keynote speaker, teacher, and author of Escaping The Build Trap.)

76 pages, O’Reilly 2013

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The Breakthrough Speaker

Why read?

361 pages, 20s & 30s Press 2018

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TED Talks

Why read?

390 pages, Mariner Books 2016

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Unleash the Power of Storytelling

Why this book?

Unleash the Power of Storytelling offers step-by-step instructions for finding, shaping and telling powerful stories. You’ll learn about the essential ingredients that go into any good story and how to avoid common storytelling pitfalls.

178 pages, Eastlawn Media 2018

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Speak With No Fear

When to read this book?

Through this book you will learn 7 strategies you can begin today. These strategies will give you a new perspective, they will prepare you, and they will give you actions to practice. As you implement these strategies, your fear will begin to fade.

181 pages, Advance, Coaching & Consulting 2019

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The Storyteller’s Secret

Why read?

288 pages, St. Martin’s Griffina 2017

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How to Deliver a TED Talk

Why read?

240 pages, McGraw-Hill Education 2013

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How to Own the Room

Why read?

240 pages, Collins 2019

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Words That Change Minds

Why read?

Learn how to use the right words with the right people, and get through the “Communication Wall”

356 pages, Bloomanity LLC 2019

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Remote

Why read?

256 pages, Currency 2013

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Distributed Teams

Why read?

335 pages, Release Mechanix 2018

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Working Remotely

Why read?

46 pages, Rocket Matter 2014

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The Year Without Pants

Why read?

272 pages, Jossey-Bass 2013

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Reinventing Organizations

Why read?

172 pages, Nelson Parker 2016

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The Digital Nomad Survival Guide

Why read?

207 pages, 2017

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Work Together Anywhere

Why read?

519 pages, Collaboration Superpowers 2018

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The Remote Revolution

Why read?

176 pages, Lioncrest Publishing 2017

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Influencing Virtual Teams

Why read?

“Smart, easy to read, and pragmatic. ‘Influencing Virtual Teams’ is now a must-read for all of my clients building remote teams.”
- Patrick Linton, Co-Founder, BoltonRemote

68 pages, CreateSpace Independent 2016

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Virtual Culture

Why read?

210 pages, Lioncrest Publishing 2018

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Interviewing Users

Why read?

176 pages, Rosenfeld Media 2013

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UX Research

Why read?

256 pages, O’Reilly Media 2016

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Talking to Humans

Why read?

88 pages, Giff Constable 2014

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The Mom Test

Why read?

136 pages, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform 2013

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The UX Book

Why read?

968 pages, Morgan Kaufmann 2012

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Lean UX

Why read?

208 pages, O’Reilly Media 2016

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Applied Artificial Intelligence

Why read?

175 pages, Topbots 2018

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Data Smart

Why read?

“When Mr. Foreman interviewed for a job at my company, he arrived dressed in a ‘Kentucky Colonel’ kind of suit and spoke about nonsensical things like barbecue, lasers, and orange juice pulp. Then, he explained how to de-mystify and solve just about any complex ‘big data’ problem in our company with simple spreadsheets. No server clusters, mainframes, or Hadoop-a-ma-jigs. Just Excel. I hired him on the spot. After reading this book, you too will learn how to use math and basic spreadsheet formulas to improve your business or, at the very least, how to trick senior executives into hiring you as their data scientist.”
— Ben Chestnut, Founder & CEO of MailChimp

All rights reserved John W. Foreman

432 pages, Wiley 2013

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Data Science for Business

Why read?

“A must-read resource for anyone who is serious about embracing the opportunity of big data.”
— Craig Vaughan, Global Vice President at SAP

414 pages, O’Reilly Media 2013

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The Creativity Code

Why read?

While most recent books on AI focus on the future of work, The Creativity Code moves us to the forefront of creative new technologies and offers a more positive and unexpected vision of our future cohabitation with machines. It challenges us to reconsider what it means to be human―and to crack the creativity code.

320 pages, Belknap Press 2019

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Designing Agentive Technology

Why read?

All rights reserved Talks at Google

240 pages, Rosenfeld Media 2017

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Data Science for Executives

Why read?

184 pages, Lioncrest Publishing 2018

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Blitzscaling

Why read?

336 pages, Currency 2018

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Creative Confidence

Why read?

“The Kelley brothers offer simple but effective tools for the “I’m not creative” set — business leaders and professionals seeking the confidence to innovate.”
— JOHN MAEDA

304 pages, Currency 2013

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The Decision Book

Why read?

176 pages, W. W. Norton & Company 2018

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Talk like TED

Why read?

288 pages, St. Martin’s Griffin 2015

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Tribe of Mentors

Why read?

624 pages, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017

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Lateral Thinking

Why read?

272 pages, Penguin Life 2016

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What They Don’t Teach You At Harvard Business School

My opinion

238 pages, Profile Books 2014

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Influence

My opinion

270, Capstone 2017

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The Tyranny of the Butterfly

My opinion

736 pages, Kiepenheuer & Witsch 2018

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Decode and Conquer

Why read?

206 pages, Impact Interview 2013

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Atomic habits

Why read?

320 pages, Avery 2018

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Make time

Why read?

304 pages, Bantam Press 2018

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A newsletter about making time for what matters, from Jake Knapp and John Zeratsky.


The Growth Handbook

Why read?

79 pages, Intercom 2018

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Solving Product Design Exercises

Why read?

Get this book

More design-related books


Prediction Machines

Why read?

“What does AI mean for your business? Read this book to find out.”
— Hal Varian, Chief Economist, Google

250 pages, Ingram Publisher Services 2018

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The Book of Why

Why read?

432 pages, Basic Books 2018

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The Culture Code

Why read?

304 pages, Bantam 2018

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More books about team development
More books about leadership


Measure what matters

Why read?

320 pages, Portfolio 2018

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Sense and Respond

Why read?

272 pages, Harvard Business Review Press 2017

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The Hard Thing About Hard Things

Why read?

304 pages, HarperBusiness 2014

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Meaningful

Why read?

176 pages, Perceptive Press 2015

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Product Leadership

Why read?

248 pages, O’Reilly Media 2017

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The Mythical Man-Month

Why read?

336 pages, Addison-Wesley Professional 1995

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Intercom on Product Management

Why read?

88 pages, Intercom 2015

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Hooked

Why read?

256 pages, Portfolio 2014

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The Laws of Simplicity

Why read?

117 pages, The MIT Press 2006

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User Story Mapping

Who Should Read This Book?

328 pages, O’Reilly Media 2014

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Product Management Essentials

This book is for

174 pages, Apress 2017

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Cracking the PM Interview

Why read?

364 pages, CareerCup 2013

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The Design of Everyday Things

Why read?

368 pages, Basic Book 2013

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The Product Manager Interview

Why read?

300 pages, Impact Interview 2017

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Help the Helper

Why read?

256 pages, Portfolio 2012

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Tribal Leadership

What’s this book about?

320 pages, HarperBusiness 2011

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The Wisdom of Teams

Why read?

352 pages, HarperBusiness 2006

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Debugging Teams

What’s this book about?

190 pages, O’Reilly Media 2015

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Clear Leadership

Who is the author?

228 pages, Nicholas Brealey 2010

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Team of Teams

Why this book might be interesting for you…

304 pages, Portfolio 2015

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Team Turnarounds

Why read?

272 pages, Jossey-Bass 2012

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Peopleware

Why read?

272 pages, Addison-Wesley Professional 2013

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The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork

Learn how…

288 pages, Thomas Nelson 2013

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Agile Retrospectives

Why read?

178 pages, Pragmatic Bookshelf 2006

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Lean In

Why read?

240 pages, Knopf 2013

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The Captain Class

Why read?

368 pages, Random House Trade Paperbacks 2018

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The Amazon Way

Why read?

172 pages, Clyde Hill Publishing 2016

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Yes to the Mess

When should I read this book?

240 pages, Harvard Business Review Press 2012

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Leadership BS

Why read?

272 pages, HarperBusiness 2015

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Becoming Steve Jobs

Why read?

465 pages, Sceptre 2015

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Work Rules!

Why this book is a must-read

416 pages, Twelve 2015

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The Outsiders

What’s this book about?

272 pages, Harvard Business Review Press 2012

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Good Strategy Bad Strategy

Why read?

322 pages, Profile Books 2017

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Leaders Eat Last

Why read?

368 pages, Portfolio 2017

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Redesigning Leadership

What’s this book about?

80 pages, MIT University Press Group Ltd 2011

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Emotionally Intelligent Leadership

Why read?

288 pages, Jossey-Bass 2015

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Permission to Screw Up

Why read?

272 pages, Portfolio 2017

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Radical Focus

Why read?

166 pages, Cucina Media LLC 2016

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Alibaba

Why read?

304 pages, Ecco 2016

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Behind the Cloud

You get insights about…

304 pages, Wiley-Blackwell 2009

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Onward

Why read?

368 pages, Rodale Books 2012

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Shoe Dog

Why read?

400 pages, Scribner 2016

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Steve Jobs

What you will learn

656 pages, Simon & Schuster 2011

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Elon Musk

Why read?

416 pages, Ecco 2017

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Intercom on Starting Up

Why read?

120 pages, Intercom 2017

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Bill & Dave

Why read?

352 pages, Portfolio Hardcover 2007

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The Intel Trinity

Why read?

560 pages, HarperBusiness 2014

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The Upstarts

Why read?

384 pages, Little, Brown and Company 2017

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Move fast and break things

Why read?

320 pages, Little, Brown and Company 2017

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The Airbnb Story

Why read?

256 pages, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017

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Wild Ride

Why read?

240 pages, Portfolio 2017

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Masters of Doom

What’s so special?

352 pages, Piatkus Books 2012

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Netflixed

Why read?

304 pages, Portfolio 2013

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Cousins Maine Lobster

What you will learn

288 pages, St. Martin’s Press 2018

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Delivering Happiness

Why read?

272 pages, Grand Central Publishing 2013

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Becoming Facebook

Why read?

256 pages, AMACOM 2017

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#Girlboss

Why read?

256 pages, Portfolio 2015

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Hatching Twitter

Why read?

320 pages, Portfolio 2014

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The Everything Store

What is it about?

386 pages, Little, Brown and Company 2013

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Designing Connected Content

What you will learn

240 pages, New Riders 2017

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Make It So

Love science fiction?

347 pages, Rosenfeld Media 2012

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Microinteractions

Why read?

170 pages, O’Reilly Media 2013

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The Field Guide to Human-Centered Design

Why read?

192 pages, IDEO.org / Design Kit 2015

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Book of Ideas

What’s inside?

254 pages, Brand Nu Limited 2016

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UX for Lean Startups

What the author says

240 pages, O’Reilly Media 2013

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Usability Matters

Interesting for app developers

325 pages, Manning Publications 2018

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Never Use Futura

Why read?

208 pages, Princeton Architectural Press 2017

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The Shape of Design

Why read?

131 pages, Frank Chimero 2012

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Designing Products People Love

Why read?

324 pages, O’Reilly Media 2016

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The Brand Gap

Why read?

208 pages, New Riders 2005

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Emotional Design

Read this book when…

272 pages, Basic Books 2005

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The Non-Designer’s Design Book

Why read?

240 pages, Peachpit Press 2014

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Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited

What you will learn

216 pages, New Riders 2014

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Speculative Everything

Why read?

240 pages, The MIT Press 2013

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About Face

Why read?

720 pages, Wiley 2014

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This Is Service Design Thinking

Unveil the buzzwords

380 pages, Bis Publishers 2012

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100 Things

Why read?

256 pages, New Riders 2011

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Design Is Storytelling

Why read?

160 pages, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum 2017

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The User Experience Team of One

Why read?

264 pages, Rosenfeld Media 2013

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User Research

Why read?

288 pages, Kogan Page 2018

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Own it

Why read?

256 pages, Crown Business 2017

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Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office

Why read?

384 pages, Business Plus 2014

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What Works

Why read?

400 pages, Belknap Press 2016

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Girl Code

Why read?

176 pages, Portfolio 2017

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Reset

Why read?

288 pages, Soiegel & Grau 2017

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A Uterus Is a Feature, Not a Bug

Why read?

320 pages, HarperBusiness 2017

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Women in Tech

Why read?

272 pages, Sasquatch Books 2017

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Brotopia

Why read?

320 pages, Portfolio 2018

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In the Company of Women

Emma Straub says:

I want to rip out every page of this glorious book and hang them on my wall so that I can be surrounded by these incredible women all day long.

351 pages, Artisan 2016

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We Should All Be Feminists

What does “feminism” mean today?

65 pages, Vintage 2014

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Earning It

Why read?

304 pages, HarperBusiness 2016

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Geek Girl Rising

Learn new face

272 pages, St. Martin’s Press 2017

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PM Library

Over 350 curated books that everyone who builds products…

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