3 more tips for concert photography — episode 1

Tristan Zand
Aug 2 · 2 min read
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The Heavy in 2010 performing at The Usine PTR — Tristan Zand 2010

Everyone has the best tips. They’ve already posted them online. Here my three more, probably good-enough random tips for concert photography.

1 — Don’t stand in the eyesight of the public.

If people come to see a live event, it is usually not to experience the photographer’s lens and butt. Imagine that you are in the audience, and therefore care for how the musical experience would be without you. Be as invisible as a ninja on the job. Not much is worse than having the experience of beautiful music with beautiful musicians with beautiful lights, and a beautiful scene ruined by a jumping figure with a big lens continuously cramping the view. Respect the audience, and it will respect you back (might even pay you a drink or hire you another time).

2 — Start your shoot from the hardest place to get too, and move your way out.

Many concert sites will have harder to get to corners. You might want to check these out, see if you can take a good shot from there, plan for a stepped route out to the best overall location where you will take most of your shots. You can get to that best position at the worst site before the concert starts. It is always easier to leave a mosh pit or that far in the corner, moving towards the quiet oasis of the VIP lounge rather than the other way around. Also, think of how you will get the best shots accordingly (think of the lens/es you will need).

3 — Turn off digital sounds, muffle your camera.

Even if it doesn’t seem to matter in the loudest punk-rock settings, it can be a terrible thing in more intimate, quieter settings. It will end up distracting musicians, annoy the audience, and might even find itself on the event’s archival recording. And you definitely shouldn’t need the sound to know what you are doing. There are many ways to muffle a mechanical or electromechanical shutter (e.g., pack in in a t-shirt or sweater), be creative. Be kind to other peoples’ earsight.

You can always check some other photographic examples on my Instagram page.

The Raw Camera — Von Cam

A raw review of diverse cameras and lenses, with a practical focus.

Tristan Zand

Written by

I like to hide behind sunglasses/music/photo/tech/arts/politics/whatever/oh and bass... Experimental photography and conceptual media. http://zand.net

The Raw Camera — Von Cam

A raw review of diverse cameras and lenses. More of how the equipment feels than sole objective technical data, but hopefully useful.

Tristan Zand

Written by

I like to hide behind sunglasses/music/photo/tech/arts/politics/whatever/oh and bass... Experimental photography and conceptual media. http://zand.net

The Raw Camera — Von Cam

A raw review of diverse cameras and lenses. More of how the equipment feels than sole objective technical data, but hopefully useful.

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