This month’s most useful tools for developers > February 2018

Some are about new thinking or new techniques, some are about old or legacy technology and some are just useful resources for different languages or platforms. The brief is simple — if we think they’re useful, you might too.

Protect your site from Cryptojacking

Earlier in the month over 4,000 websites — many of which were Government services — were compromised to run crypto-mining scripts. It’s not exactly a new type of threat but there’s a pretty easy way to defend yourself against this kind of attack.

“Alexa. How do I build apps for you with Couchbase?”

They say that if you’re not thinking about Zero UI design — voice commands — you’re designing for the past, so this is super-useful. Alexa Skills with Azure Functions and Couchbase.

When the React Native starter kit isn’t good enough

At Ueno, we built our own starter kit for React Native. Why did we do it? How did we do it? Read on.

The Traits formerly known as Units

This document describes what traits are, why they are a useful concept, and how to use and create them in an RxSwift project.

“IPFS is the Distributed Web”

A peer-to-peer hypermedia protocol to make the web faster, safer, and more open (on GitHub), and the demo is mighty impressive.

.NET Application Architecture

Huge cache of free books, PDFs, ePubs, sample apps, and videos for making .NET, ASP.NET, microservices, and mobile apps. Find it here.

FluentSwitch

Inspired by Ruby syntax for returning a value from a switch statement. It’s on GitHub here.

CrookedStyleSheets

Webpage tracking only using CSS (and no JS). Just a proof of concept, but we like it.

“I can’t believe there is a shortcut for this, how oddly specific.”

Hotkey to show hidden files and folders in File Open dialog? It’s the little things….

“Our product/code will be structured as our organization is structured”

Some thoughts on organizing a team of developers. Tips using a flow-perspective.

A Programmable Programming Language

“As the software industry enters the era of language-oriented programming, it needs programmable programming languages.” This makes more sense when you read it.

On Writing Software (well?)

In which (he talks) about a dislike of code comments, replacing them with explaining constants or extracting a concept into Rails itself.

“Why does HRESULT begin with H when it’s not a handle to anything?”

Ever wonder why Windows APIs, configurations and applications are often baffling and odd? It’s been around a number of years, but this blog presents an insider’s view on the why and how of Windows’ weirdness.

Project Things

“…anyone can now build their own Things Gateway to control their connected device directly from the web.” Mozilla’s new open framework for connecting your devices to the web.

Building an animated login Avatar

Rather fun and engaging — How to build an animated login avatar, with the help of some trigonometry & GSAP. Joosching up Username and password.

Big Blue AI Tools

A practical guide to building and implementing AI applications in the enterprise (big business, not the starship).
 IBM’s AI Dev’s Toolbox

Don’t think functional, *feel* functional…

This months bundle of books for Devs — this month it’s functional programming of course.

Did you know that 1 in 4 developers learned to code before they could drive?

“For the first time, we surveyed the HackerRank community to get a pulse on developer skills (when did they push code for the first time, how do they learn coding, what are the favorite languages and frameworks, what do they want in a job, what hiring managers want in a candidate, and more).” This is who we are apparently.

Developer: “We have a problem.”
Manager: “Remember, there are no such things as problems, only opportunities.”
Developer: “Well then, we have a DDoS opportunity.”

Originally published at dootrix.com on February 26, 2018.

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