Digital democracy

Gary Neal
The Silent Politician
5 min readApr 14, 2024

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Politics via the Internet

Computer keyboard key with vote now printed on it
Photo by Zerbor ID 51968275 Dreamstime.com

Many walks of life are being transformed by digital internet interconnectivity. So why is government and democracy different?

In the UK, the political engagement with the public is very low, merging on apathy.

The people that do seem to be taking an interest are young adults. Could they be the shoe horn to get digital governance accepted by the wider public?

According to Wikipedia, “Digital democracy uses Information and Communications Technology in political and governance processes.” This needs to work both ways: Keeping citizens informed and allowing citizens to give feedback to the government.

This would logically lead to direct democracy, which would bypass the media and other political parties. It would redistribute political power from elected officials to individuals or groups.

Would politicians be willing to give that power up? This would also highlight the difference between self-serving politicians and those willing to serve the public (what they are supposed to do)

We could see a resurgence of live forums and chat rooms, provided there was some form of chatbot control, particularly for malicious participants.

Low turnout at elections are a particular source of irritation. When only 30–50% of the…

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Gary Neal
The Silent Politician

Retired taxi driver, creative writer, experimental poet, computer enthusiast, web design and learning to program