I Want It Now

Is Amazon Turning Consumers Into Veruca Salts?

Urgent isn’t always URGENT

David Asch
E³ — Entertain Enlighten Empower
3 min readApr 28, 2024

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Bratty Veruca Salt being her greedy, horrible self
“I want it now” — Julie Dawn Cole as Veruca Salt wreaks havoc in the Oompa Loompa egg wrapping room in the original 1971 Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Photo credit: Warner Brothers

When an Amazon Prime aesthete drops a bundle on an Italian espresso machine, they want it delivered ASAP, right?

Natch.

Like Veruca Salt¹, they want it now.

Unless Amazon offers a small digital reward for accepting a later delivery on Amazon Day², where they bundle multiple items together in fewer boxes and deliver everything in a single trip, the prospect of saving a few bucks on a streaming movie or Kindle book is often enough to convince customers that their needs aren’t so urgent.

Tree-huggers are so eager to help Amazon save the planet that they don’t need a digital reward incentive to delay delivery.

Fancy Italian Espresso Machine with delayed delivery. Image from author’s make-believe Amazon cart

Supply chain experts insist that fully automated micro-fulfillment centers must be placed in everyone’s backyards to meet customer expectations of immediate delivery. They claim consumers expect nothing less than drone delivery of packages the instant they click the Place Order button.

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David Asch
E³ — Entertain Enlighten Empower

Founder of the Management Consulting Company https://10xPrinciples.com. Available for consulting, podcasts, and speaking engagements.