New Facebook Emoji Is Bad for Privacy

A striking recommendation of the Belgian police — those who want to protect their privacy online, may be more careful with the new “reaction” buttons on Facebook. Because Facebook never lets an opportunity pass on to gather more information about us. The company measures our responses to the posts of our friends or watched pages as well as the effectiveness of the ads on our profile through our clicks.

FACEBOOK THE MARKETING CHAMPION

When there was only the “like” button to express your feeling, many users complained that they could not express their dissatisfaction or it did not indicate that they did not like something. Facebook responded to their request and added the reaction button, but also made it a way of making more money from advertisers.

“As you know, we are a product for Facebook, the icons help not only to express your feelings, they also help Facebook assess the effectiveness of the ads on your profile,”

states a post on the police’s official website on May 11 statement.

Since the new buttons joined by five other emoji, users can react much faster with a single click in addition to the old-fashioned thumb up. Apart from just liking it, we can now also express that we find something amazing or funny, we were stunned, sad, or angry.

The Federal Police believes that the resulting algorithm can achieve faster and more accurate information about users. Thus, the social networking site will get more insight into the users to show ads at the right time. If it appears that you are in a good mood, the police force claims –

“Facebook will infer that you are more susceptible to an advertisement and will be able to sell advertising space to marketers by telling them they have a better chance to get you to react at certain times.”

police explained.

“In conclusion, it will be one more reason not to click too fast if you want to preserve your privacy.”

So, think twice the next time you are tempted to hit the react button.

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