This is probably why Apple wants to produce iPhones in India to sell in the country

As we now know that recently the American tech giant Apple has taken a plan to produce its iPhone devices in India through Wistron the Chinese tech manufacturer company which is supposed to build a new plant at Bangalore in India to produce Apple’s iPhones for the Indian market. However, the question is why is Apple suddenly concerned to produce iPhones in India?

HUGE PROFIT FOR APPLE

Well, maybe here is the answer to that question that recently, according to Counterpoint research data the record shows that last year in 2016 Apple had a giant amount of business in Indian selling over 2.5 million units of iPhone with over $450 for per unit in the country.

Though in Q4 Apple sold 62% of all the “premium” devices in India but in the overall sale, the company couldn’t even reach the top of the list while the South Korean tech giant Samsung was at 24%, trailed by Vivo at 10%. The third and fourth position are taken by Xiaomi and Lenovo to 9% each.

So, the matter is not related to the highest selling or top lists but selling over 2.5 million units of the handset in a country is obviously a big matter for any company. No one knows, maybe in the future, we will see that Apple appears in the top list of selling the highest units of its iPhone devices in India.

SECOND LARGEST MARKET AFTER CHINA

One important thing is that comparably, producing the iPhone in India for sale in the country must cost less for Apple rather than assemble iPhones in China to ship to India to sell in the market. Therefore, in the future, most probably it will help Apple to sell more iPhone devices in India with lower price than the current price.

However, no doubt that after China, India also has a big market for Apple, therefore we believe that this is a great plan which Apple has taken to produce their iPhones in India, may be in the future, following Apple more tech giants will be interested to produce their smartphones in India to sell in the country.

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