Tennis Note #33

Time Violation Warning Study: Motivation & Preliminary Results

Nikita Taparia
May 16, 2016 · 5 min read

Test Case: Rafael Nadal

If you look at the Twitter extracted data, you will notice one thing: NADAL. More people tweet about Nadal when it comes to TVWs, and in quite a bit of detail. Between twitter and the form, we accumulated close to 100 matches involving Nadal [removing any obvious overlaps, giving priority to the form]. From this, I eliminated any entry that had no information about the game scoreline from anyone (either the score or terminology like ‘BP’ or ‘breakpoint’). This left me with 60 matches to analyze, in which 46 matches had the precise game scoreline. Of course, it is important to note that there may be a bit of bias here because most people tweet inconvenient TVWs. Nevertheless, the visuals below illustrate how this breaks down.

The heatmap helps put things in perspective with all the combinations for a score. At the same time, with such little sample size, the histogram gives more precision. It is entirely possible that there is a bias because we sampled Twitter data and people are more likely to mention break points. At the same time, many of the overlaps included a scoreline. More data [not from twitter] would prove more sufficient and reliable.
When reading this, look at the game number the time violation warning was issued and the set (if it is available). Then look at the color of the set scoreline (in columns) and this will tell you what type of game scoreline was on the board when the TVW was issued.

The Tennis Notebook

A ‘romantic’ tale between tennis enthusiasts and an elegant sport. Includes light commentary and analysis of the game.

Nikita Taparia

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Engineer. Scientist. Data Nerd. Cookie/Coffee Addict. Educator. Tennis/WoSo. Photographer. Musician. Artist. Whiteboards. @ByTheMinTennis Commentator. Writer.

The Tennis Notebook

A ‘romantic’ tale between tennis enthusiasts and an elegant sport. Includes light commentary and analysis of the game.