Here’s the Biggest Lesson I Learned From a Year of Autistic Burnout

It forced me to accept my limitations

Phoenix
The Unexpected Autistic Life

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A person sitting in their bed with a cup of coffee or tea. They look tired.
Photo by Kinga Howard on Unsplash

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After months of pushing myself too far, I finally found the courage to quit my last job.

I wish I’d done it sooner. A year has passed since, and I’ve spent the majority of that time so far working on recovering from autistic burnout. When I’m not writing or applying to jobs, I’m often wrestling with my brain as it insists that I should be doing more.

And in a weird way, I’m glad I burnt out.

Recently, I read a book called Laziness Does Not Exist by Devon Price. It brings up a key point about laziness (besides the fact that it doesn’t exist):

When someone is perceived as lazy — either by themselves or by others — the reality is likely that they’re actually doing more, not less.

The book draws on many examples to make this point, and I recommend reading it if you want to look more into that. Once you notice the links between this concept and autistic burnout, though, it’s impossible to unsee them.

  • Autistic people don’t grow accustomed to sensory input in the same way…

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Phoenix
The Unexpected Autistic Life

Neurodivergent and queer writer of both fiction and nonfiction. He/they. Check out my recommendations (affiliate links): https://benable.com/nebulanix