McLaren Speedtail: Fastest McLaren ever made.

Sam Ayres
Sam Ayres
Oct 26, 2018 · 5 min read

McLaren Speedtail is McLaren’s first Hyper-GT.

McLaren Speedtail
McLaren Speedtail

Just like the McLaren F1, the Speedtail features a central driving position with two seats either side. Encapsulating these seats is a teardrop styled cabin, built on a bespoke Monocage carbon fibre structure. Elegance has been created through reduction. Every body panel is carbon fibre and designed to reduce drag. It’s features like these that result in the Speedtail having the lowest drag coefficient of any road going McLaren vehicle. Interestingly, Speedtail is narrower than the P1 but over half a metre longer to more resemble the teardrop shape.

The Speedtail is beautiful in some senses and weird in others. From the front, sleek, sharp lines and narrow lights posses real beauty. The rear is also pretty astonishing, however, the side profile is quite unusual, and the wheel covers kind of throw me off. There is doubting though that this is one special vehicle.

McLaren Speedtail
McLaren Speedtail

Powertrain & Performance

0–300km/h time is reached in just 12.8 seconds. To put this into perspective, the McLaren p1 accomplished this feat in 16.5 seconds. There was talk that the Speedtail would reach 300mph (482 km/h). It doesn’t but still achieves a grand top speed of 250mph (403km/h). Still, this makes the Speedtail the fastest McLaren ever built, beating the Mclaren F1 by 7 mph. McLaren partnered with Pirelli to design and produce a bespoke P-ZERO tyre to make speeds like this possible.

Something that you will instantly notice is the carbon fibre front-wheel static aero covers. These are used to reduce drag and work by remaining in a fixed position as the wheels rotate. keeping the air ‘attached’ to the vehicle and allowing it to flow onwards the door blades and rear of the vehicle. McLaren explains in detail how the wheel covers work with other aerodynamic elements.

“ The static wheel covers work in conjunction with multiple ducts and air paths to reduce turbulent air within the wheelarches. As air passes out of the LTRs, for instance, it is vented into the front wheelarches. From there — together with heat energy generated by the lightweight, carbon ceramic braking system — the air is channeled through the ducts in the fixed front wheel aero cover in a consistent flow pattern. Pressure within the wheelarches is also reduced via the lower door vents, which draw the turbulent air created by the rotating front wheels out of the arches and drive it smoothly along the sides of the McLaren Speedtail “

Similar to the Audi e-tron, the Speedtail doesn’t feature any wing mirrors. Instead, two discreet high-def cameras glide out of the side doors when the ignition is activated. Why? Simple, mirrors create plenty of air turbulence that isn’t wanted when you are trying to reach 400km/h.

McLaren Speedtail
McLaren Speedtail

Central Driving Position

Velocity Mode

Pricing and customisation


Originally published at The Motorist.

TheMotorist

TheMotorist is an online magazine bringing the latest news and driven reviews about new cars in South Africa and Worldwide

    Sam Ayres

    Written by

    Sam Ayres

    Co Owner of TheMotorist digital magazine. www.themotorist.co.za

    TheMotorist

    TheMotorist is an online magazine bringing the latest news and driven reviews about new cars in South Africa and Worldwide