Journal 110 — a garrulous parrot, the retail businesses cutting out the middleman, a political scandal, Fortnite & a profile of John McCain.

John McCain being interviewed in 1973.

This week — learning about humanity’s place in the universe by playing a video game, a garrulous parrot named Poe, a look at the retail businesses cutting out the middleman, and a personal perspective on a political scandal.

If you only read one thing — Michael Lewis’s 1997 New York Times profile of John McCain is worth the time.

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The Subversive | The New York Times | Politics

A profile of US Senator John McCain, written in 1997 by author and journalist Michael Lewis (Lewis’s notable works include Moneyball, Flash Boys & The Big Short). He found an unusual politician, unwilling to operate like most of his peers, something that has proven both a strength and a hindrance throughout his career.

bit.ly/nyt-mccain

The Heart and the Fist | The London Review of Books | Politics

The journalist that wrote this story covering a political scandal surrounding the right wing, ex-Navy Seal, Governor of Missouri has an unusual angle — she went to the University of Oxford with his wife, and they were friends.

bit.ly/lrb-heartandfist

Inside the Wild Race to Overthrow Every Consumer Category | Inc. | Business

Hundreds of startups are hoping to emulate the success of a model popularised by eyewear brand Warby Parker — cut out the middle man and offer a designer aesthetic direct to the customer at highly competitive prices. It’s easier said than done.

bit.ly/inc-warby

Birds of a Feather | Topic | Life

The bittersweet story of Poe, an unusually articulate parrot.

bit.ly/topic-parrots

I Played Fortnite and Figured Out the Universe | The Atlantic | Society

The author of this piece played one of the world’s most popular and talked about video games (cf Premier League footballers mimicking its virtual dances in their real-world celebrations) and thinks he has discovered something about the way humans work.

bit.ly/atlantic-fortnite

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