What I learned writing an entire book in just 30 days

On July 31st I decided to write a book…

And on August 1st I started writing it. But I didn’t just write a book. I decided to write a book live in front of the whole world to see. Ok, it wasn’t the whole world. Just the people who follow and read my stuff.

So for the next 30 days I wrote one part of it and published it on my blog and on Medium.

And then on day 31 I wanted to edit it and publish it. If you’re good at math, you might realize that today is day 31. And you’re right. And I was never really good at math. And I never really pay attention to the months. That’s why today is day 31. And I’m still writing.

And the reason is simple. When I setup the pre-order for the book I setup September 2nd. Which is tomorrow. So I still have one day to go. And if I have a day, why not use that day to share some of the things I’ve learned over the past 30 days.

Sure, the hardest part is still yet to come. The editing. Which has always been my biggest nightmare. I just hate it. Should you even edit your own books? I don’t know. I do it. Because I want it to be my own authentic voice. I don’t want anyone to change anything.

And if I have typos or grammar issues in it, then I don’t really care. That’s just who I am. I’m not perfect. But I’m trying the best I can. Every single day. And if that’s not enough for some people, well, then nothing will ever be enough.

So I want to use the extra day we just won to share some of my experiences with you. I want to share with you some of the things I’ve learned writing a book in 30 days…

# start small first

I want to get this straight before anyone tries to do the same and write an actual book in just 30 days. I’ve been publishing one blog post every day for the past year or so. Every single day. So whenever you think about doing something, like writing a book in 30 days, start small. Try to write one blog post a day first. Or do what I did a few times. Make a book out of your existing blog posts and then start selling it on Amazon. As a matter of fact, I think that’s even something one of my readers did when she realized that I was writing a book in 30 days. Or do whatever you want to. Everything is possible…

# it’s hard

It was hard. Especially when you’re working on more than one big project at the same time. And writing a book in 30 days is a big project. At least for me. And I had 4 things going on at the same time. So in between I had to cancel one other thing. And another thing just disappeared. At least for now. Whenever you try to do something like this, make sure that’s the only thing you do right now that needs extra attention. Too many things needing extra attention just doesn’t work. It’s like having an extra attention bank account. The more extra attention you withdraw from that account the less will be available for other things that might need extra attention…

# schedule it

I never schedule my posts. I don’t have a specific time when I write. I don’t get up at 6am. Even though I would like to. I don’t have any writing rituals. I don’t use any writing tools. Or things that help me to stay organized. If I’m outside I take small notepad with me. If I’m in front of my laptop I write those ideas down in a file. Sometimes I go back to them. And sometimes I don’t. So how am I able to write so consistently? How am I able to write one blog post every single day for an entire year? How was I able to write a book in 30 days? I took the decision to do it. I took the decision to write every single day. That’s the only schedule I need. That’s the only writing tool I need. And sometimes I write at 9am in the morning. Sometimes I write in the evening. And sometimes I write at 2 or 3am in the morning even though I’d like to go to sleep. But mostly, I just write. That’s all the planning and scheduling I need…

# outline it

Just like I said before, when I started writing this books right here I was already writing and publishing one blog post every single day for almost an entire year. But I was mostly writing unrelated things. Things that just came to my mind .Things I thought about. Ideas I had. But most of it wasn’t really related. The only thing that held all of it together was the overall theme of my blog called rethinking the now. So writing a entire book in such a small period of time required some planning. At least a rough outline. I split the whole book in about 10 parts before I started writing. And I had the title. And the intro. For me the title and the intro were the most important things. Everything followed from there.

# screw your outline

If I look at the outline I wrote before I started writing I have to admit that I barely wrote about any of the things I wanted to write about. My outline wasn’t really very detailed. It were just a few themes. The overall themes mostly stayed the same. But the content evolved with my writing. I didn’t really know what exactly I wanted to write about. Some things just evolved naturally through comments people wrote on the individual parts. So it’s good to have an outline. But it’s also good to be flexible…

# start with one post

Or one concept. Many (non fiction) books are based on one concept. On one main idea and then they’re expanded into an entire book. It’s important though that each individual post adds additional value to the overall theme. If I think about it, the whole thing is just based on one blog post I wrote a while ago. It was this one right here. And everything went back to the overall concept. To the overall idea. Does this also work for fiction books? I don’t know. Maybe. Maybe not. But as most fiction books are somehow also autobiographies (and therefore non fiction) without the authors willing to admit it, it might also work. But I really don’t know…

# better

Sure, you can always make it better. There are always things you could improve. Always. But at one point it’s about getting your stuff out there. No matter what. No matter if you’re 100% satisfied with it or not. Perfection kills. Pretty much everything…

# it’s possible

After all, it’s possible. I did it. And so can you. The most important thing is to start small. To get started. And then you go on from there. You’ve gotta start small. Like writing one blog post a day. Or watching one lesson of that new Udemy course a day. Or whatever. Just like they say, Rome wasn’t built in a day. What got me where I am right now took me more than three years. Three years of baby steps. One small step every day. Sometimes I had to go back many steps to be able to make a baby step forward. But what matters is that you keep making steps. No matter how big or small. You’ve gotta keep moving. No matter what…

I would love to say that I’ve found the secret sauce to writing consistently. I would love to be able to share some amazing tools with you. Some mind blowing hacks to write more. To do more. To be more consistent. I’d love to tell you how to cut corners. How to become a better writer. How to become a better singer. Or how to become a better version of yourself.

But at the end of the day it all comes down to one simple thing. And one thing only…

Doing your thing. Over and over again.

And nothing else…

P.S. You can check out and pre-order the book here. It’ll be released tomorrow!

P.P.S. If you enjoyed this, please follow me on Facebook here.

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