Architecting ECEC Career Structures:

Aligning Intrinsic and Extrinsic Drivers for Long-Term Adoption Inclusion

Shane Bouel
Thoughtless Delineation
12 min readMar 13, 2024

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The Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) Capacity Study, led by JSA (Jobs and Skills Australia) in partnership with HumanAbility, reflects a growing recognition of the need for comprehensive understanding and support within the sector.

As the government commissions JSA and HumanAbility to undertake this study, it aims to provide critical evidence and recommendations to support workforce planning in ECEC, encompassing a detailed examination of current and future needs. This initiative aligns with the broader objectives of promoting inclusive environments and addressing the diverse needs of children and families.

Architecting ECEC Career Structures: Aligning Intrinsic and Extrinsic Drivers for Long-Term Adoption Inclusion

This (4-part proposal put forth by Shane Bouel) underscores the profound significance of addressing adoption within the framework of the Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) Capacity Study. It transcends mere initiative, embodying a solemn commitment to truth, human rights, and an unwavering duty of care towards adoptees and their families.

At its core, this proposal recognizes that adoption is not merely a subject for discussion but a matter of fundamental human rights and dignity. By advocating for its inclusion in the ECEC Capacity Study, Shane Bouel underscores the imperative of acknowledging the lived experiences of adoptees within the broader discourse of early childhood education and care.

The gravity of this proposal lies in its acknowledgment of the inherent complexities and challenges faced by adoptees, whose narratives often remain marginalized or overlooked. By elevating adoption to the forefront of the ECEC Capacity Study, Shane Bouel reaffirms the principle of truth-telling and the pursuit of justice for those affected by adoption practices.

Moreover, this proposal reflects a profound sense of duty of care towards adoptees and their families, recognizing the need for comprehensive understanding, support, and advocacy within the ECEC sector. It underscores the moral obligation to create inclusive and nurturing environments that honour the dignity and rights of all children, irrespective of their adoption status.

In essence, Shane Bouel’s proposal transcends mere policy considerations; it embodies a moral imperative to confront the truths of adoption, uphold human rights, and fulfil our collective duty of care towards the most vulnerable members of society. It serves as a beacon of hope for a future where every child, regardless of their background, can thrive in an environment of compassion, understanding, and support.

Please be sure to read the supplied links for further information.

Part One —

Enhancing Early Childhood Education and Care Capacity: Addressing Gaps in Adoption Support and Coercive Control Legislation

This segment of the report delves into the landscape of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) in Queensland, Australia, under the Chatham House Rule. It examines the glaring gaps in adoption education and support within the ECEC system and discusses recent legislative developments concerning coercive control and its implications for ECEC practitioners.

Part Two —

Unveiling the Deep-Seated Trauma: Acknowledging Adoptee Identity Integration in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC)

In Part Two, the narrative of adoptee trauma is brought to the forefront within the context of ECEC. Through acquiring poignant testimonies and reflections, this section highlights the profound depths of adoptee trauma often overlooked by mainstream discourse and policy frameworks, emphasizing the need for recognition and healing within early childhood education settings.

Part Three —

Comprehensive Overview of CHC30121 Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care

Turning our attention to vocational education, Part Three provides a detailed examination of the CHC30121 Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care. While this qualification equips educators with essential skills, it falls short in addressing the unique needs of adoptees. Recommendations for improvement are proposed to ensure the qualification aligns with principles of empowerment and adoptee visibility.

The National Quality Framework (NQF) established by the Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA) is a comprehensive set of standards and guidelines designed to ensure high-quality education and care for children. However, when assessed in light of the principles outlined in “Empowerment in Action and “The Adoptee Voice and Visibility Framework.” Several inconsistencies, issues, and omissions become apparent.

Part Four —

Embracing Adoptee Voices Across Vocational Education: A Call for Holistic Recognition and Support

Expanding the discourse beyond early childhood education, Part Four explores the imperative for holistic recognition and support for adoptees across vocational education. It advocates for the integration of adoption awareness into vocational education curricula and calls for a sister initiative for forced adoption, respecting reconciliation, and acknowledging the ongoing journey towards healing.

Through this comprehensive report, we aim to underscore the lack of interconnectedness of adoption awareness and support across all education and care sectors, including (ECEC, individual & and aging care). By fostering inclusive environments and amplifying adoptee voices, we strive to create a society where every individual, regardless of their background, feels valued and empowered to fulfil their potential.

Report: Part One

Enhancing Early Childhood Education and Care Capacity:

Addressing Gaps in Adoption Support and Coercive Control Legislation

Under the Chatham House Rule, this report discusses critical gaps in support and education concerning adoption within the context of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) in Queensland, Australia. It also examines the recent legislative developments regarding coercive control and its implications for ECEC practitioners.

Adoption Education and Support in ECEC:

Currently, the vocational education curriculum in Queensland lacks substantial content on adoption, except for a notable exception in Certificate IV in Greyhound Racing. This omission is concerning, given the significance of adoption-related issues in society and the potential impact on children and families within the ECEC system.

Family Wellbeing Services:

The Family Wellbeing Services in Queensland, although crucial for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, do not adequately address the specific needs of adoptive families. This oversight perpetuates a lack of acknowledgment and support for adoptive parents and children within the broader framework of family support services.

Implications for ECEC Capacity and Career Structure:

The absence of adoption-related education and support in ECEC training programs limits the capacity of practitioners to understand and respond effectively to the needs of adoptive families and children. As such, it undermines the comprehensive nature of ECEC capacity-building efforts.

Career Structure Support:

A robust ECEC career structure should encompass both intrinsic and extrinsic motivations for practitioners. However, without adequate education and support around adoption, practitioners may struggle to find intrinsic motivation in supporting adoptive families, leading to gaps in service provision and diminished job satisfaction.

RAQ Support:

Relationships Australia Queensland (RAQ) supports this legislative initiative, recognizing its importance in safeguarding survivors and addressing power imbalances within relationships. The inclusion of coercive control legislation aligns with RAQ’s commitment to promoting healthy and respectful relationships.

Legislative Response to Coercive Control:

The Queensland Government has passed legislation to criminalize coercive control as a standalone offence by 2025, with a maximum penalty of 14 years in jail. This legislative step signifies a significant advancement in protecting survivors of domestic abuse and holding perpetrators accountable.

Questions remain from adoptees: will this initiative adequately and respectfully include adoption-related discourse?

Addressing the gaps in adoption support and education within the ECEC system is crucial for enhancing capacity and ensuring comprehensive care for all children and families. Additionally, the implementation of coercive control legislation represents a positive step towards promoting safety and accountability within relationships. Moving forward, it is essential to prioritize education, support, and legislative measures that address the diverse needs of families within the ECEC sector.

For further information, please see:

Report: Part Two

Unveiling the Deep-Seated Trauma:

Acknowledging Adoptee Identity Integration in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC)

Within the realm of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC), the narrative of adoptee trauma remains shrouded in silence, overlooked by mainstream discourse and policy frameworks. Yet, through the expressive language of adoptee testimonies, we uncover the profound depths of trauma often disregarded by societal and governmental entities.

The Depths of Adoptee Trauma:

Soulful Fragmentation:

Within the world of ECEC, adoptees navigate a landscape of fragmentation, where the echoes of their pre-adoptive innocence clash with the harsh realities of post-adoptive existence. This internal dissonance, akin to a puzzle missing its vital pieces, plunges adoptees into a whirlwind of existential longing and profound self-discovery.

Echoes of Unspoken Grief:

Amidst the laughter and play of early childhood, adoptees harbour the echoes of unspoken grief, a silent melody of loss resonating through the whimsical corridors of their souls. Each crayon stroke on paper becomes a silent plea for understanding; each shared story becomes a quest for belonging in a world that often feels too vast and unfamiliar.

A Call for Recognition and Healing:

Honouring the Depths:

In ECEC, it is imperative to honour the depths of adoptee trauma to acknowledge the sacred wounds etched upon their spirits by the hand of fate. Through colourful expressions and imaginative play, we must create space for adoptees to explore the depths of their identity or sadness in the lack of identity, weaving together the disparate threads of their past and present into a vibrant tapestry of selfhood. (Relevancy to the restrictions of Bith Certificates in adoption)

Embracing Therapeutic Imperatives:

Within the confines of ECEC, therapists become the magicians of healing, wielding the wand of compassion and understanding to guide adoptees through the labyrinth of their pain. Through whimsical storytelling and playful interventions, therapists unlock the door to self-discovery, empowering adoptees to embrace the whimsy of their identity journey with courage and resilience.

Amidst the varied experiences of adoptees and the depth of their shared trauma, there arises a compelling plea for recognition and healing within the domain of Early Childhood Education and Care. It is imperative for educators and policymakers to acknowledge this call, integrating empathy and robust support systems for adoptees as they navigate their journey of self-discovery amidst unimaginable Loss.

For further information, please see:

Report: Part Three

Comprehensive Overview of CHC30121 Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care.

Embracing Adoptee Voices: A Holistic Approach to Early Childhood Education

In the realm of early childhood education, the CHC30121 Certificate III in Early Childhood Education and Care stands as a beacon, guiding educators in shaping the experiences of young learners. However, amidst the colourful tapestry of learning frameworks, there lies a silent omission — the nuanced challenges faced by adoptees. This comprehensive overview seeks to unravel the intricacies of this qualification, examining its alignment with principles of empowerment and adoptee visibility.

The CHC30121 Certificate III equips educators with essential skills to foster children’s well-being and development. However, it falls short in addressing the unique needs of adoptees. By juxtaposing the curriculum with principles of empowerment for adoptees, we uncover inconsistencies and gaps.

Overview of the Qualification:

This foundational qualification outlines the role of educators in nurturing children’s development within approved frameworks. While it covers core aspects of early childhood education, it lacks specific provisions for adoptee-related challenges.

Incorporating Adoption-Aware Practices:

Enhancing the qualification to include adoption-aware practices is paramount. Educators need training in cultural sensitivity, trauma-informed approaches, and adoptee-specific issues to create inclusive environments.

Collaboration and Professional Development:

Collaboration between educational authorities and adoptees can enrich the qualification. Professional development opportunities should integrate adoptee voices, fostering empathy and understanding among educators.

Addressing Lifelong Challenges:

By acknowledging adoption as trauma, educators can navigate the lifelong challenges adoptees face. Core units should include content on identity exploration, grief, and shame, empowering educators to provide holistic support.

Enhanced Cultural Competency:

Expanding cultural competency components can enrich the qualification. Educators should embrace diverse cultural perspectives, including those relevant to adoption experiences.

Recommendations for Improvement:

Introducing specialized adoption units within the qualification can deepen understanding and support for adoptees. These units should address historical contexts and contemporary challenges and anticipate future dynamics in adoption.

When evaluated alongside the principles delineated in “Empowerment in Action” and “The Adoptee Voice and Visibility Framework,” the National Quality Framework (NQF), instituted by the Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA), reveals a range of inconsistencies, challenges, and oversights.

As we advocate for inclusivity and foresight in early childhood education, integrating adoptee voices is essential. By enhancing the CHC30121 qualification with adoption-aware practices, educators can create nurturing environments that honor the diverse experiences of all children.

For further information, please see:

Report: Part Four

Embracing Adoptee Voices Across Vocational Education:

A Call for Holistic Recognition and Support

Expanding the discourse on adoption awareness and support beyond early childhood education, this segment delves into the imperative for holistic recognition and support for adoptees across vocational education. Through a lens of long-term commitment and historical acknowledgment, we explore the lack if interconnectedness of adoptee experiences and the need for comprehensive education and support systems.

Adoption’s Influence Across Vocational Education:

Expanding Educational Horizons:

Adoption’s impact transcends early childhood education, extending its reach into vocational education realms such as individual support and aged care. As we navigate discussions around forced adoption and its fallout, it becomes evident that adoption awareness is not merely a niche concern but a societal imperative that permeates various sectors of education and care.

History’s Influence:

The truth of adoption, with its complex layers of joy and sorrow, must find its rightful place in our history books and educational narratives. By acknowledging adoption’s historical significance, we pave the way for a more nuanced understanding of its present-day implications, fostering empathy and awareness among future generations of vocational practitioners.

Challenges and Opportunities in Vocational Education:

Addressing Trauma Across Sectors:

Adoptee trauma, often overlooked or underestimated, leaves an indelible mark on individuals across their lifespan. Vocational educators must be equipped with the knowledge and skills to recognize and respond to the unique needs of adoptees within their respective fields, from aged care facilities to disability support services.

Creating Inclusive Spaces:

Vocational education settings serve as pivotal spaces for adoptees to find their footing in the workforce and society at large. By fostering inclusive environments that validate adoptee experiences and provide tailored support, vocational educators can empower adoptees to navigate the complexities of adulthood with resilience and confidence.

A Call for Comprehensive Integration:

Embedding Adoption Awareness:

Integrating adoption awareness modules into vocational education curricula is essential for cultivating empathy and understanding among future practitioners. These modules should encompass diverse perspectives, including narratives of resilience and empowerment, to provide a holistic view of adoptee experiences and power disparities in systemic adoption discourse.

Long-Term Commitment:

Recognizing and supporting adoptees in vocational education settings requires a sustained, long-term commitment from educational institutions and policymakers. By prioritizing ongoing training, resources, and support networks, we can ensure that adoptees receive the acknowledgment and assistance they need to thrive in their chosen vocations.

The Case for a Reconciliation Initiative:

Sister Initiative for Forced Adoption:

Similar to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander initiatives, there is a pressing need for a dedicated, long-term campaign to address the legacy of forced adoption. This initiative would not only acknowledge the historical injustices faced by adoptees but also pave the way for reconciliation and healing within society.

Respecting Reconciliation:

By launching a sister initiative for forced adoption, we demonstrate our commitment to reconciliation and healing, acknowledging the trauma inflicted upon adoptees and their families. This campaign would provide a platform for truth-telling, apology, and reparative measures, fostering understanding and empathy among all Australians.

Acknowledging the National Apology Anniversary:

11th Anniversary of the National Apology:

On the 21st of March, we commemorate the 11th anniversary of the National Apology for Forced Adoption. Despite this significant milestone, the promise of meaningful change in public acknowledgment, policy change, and support is yet to be fulfilled. It serves as a poignant reminder of the ongoing journey towards healing and reconciliation for adoptees and their families.

As we navigate the intricate intersections of adoption, education, and vocational training, it is imperative to heed the call for holistic recognition and support. By embedding adoption awareness into vocational education and fostering inclusive spaces for adoptees to flourish, we honor their resilience and enrich our collective understanding of diversity and inclusion in all facets of life. Through a sister initiative for forced adoption, we can further advance reconciliation efforts and pave the way for a more compassionate and inclusive society.

This comprehensive report underscores the lack of interconnectedness of adoption awareness and support across various domains of education and care, advocating for a holistic approach that acknowledges the diverse experiences of adoptees and fosters inclusive environments for their growth and empowerment.

For further information, please see:

Please note that I will be editing this for the inclusion of future relevant developments.

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Shane Bouel
Thoughtless Delineation

Using creativity to lift standards of ethics & morality by questioning half-truths and denouncing the conservancy of inhumane ideologies.