Presence

Stop. Focus. Be here now.

How often do you take time to be fully present? And what is the difference between your life experience when you ‘are’ present vs when you ‘are not’ present?

Let’s illustrate a few examples of moments you are likely to be present and any emotions you might link to them:

  • Birthdays
  • Deaths
  • Weddings
  • New relationships
  • Celebration/Events
  • Birth of a loved one

If you think about it, it’s pretty easy to remember how you felt in each of the above situations. In fact, it’s probably easy for you to recall images, or even a mental filmstrip of the day. You might remember a funny conversation, the temperature outside, an unusual incident, or an aroma in the air.

Because you’re fully present, your senses are honed in, and you are experiencing. During moments you are fully present, you are programming your subconscious to feel and think based upon the quality of your experience; and since your subconscious mind dictates your life, it’s a good idea to embrace and enjoy moments you are present.

Now, let’s look at the opposite example of being fully present: conscious distraction. During moments of conscious distraction, you are operating a subconscious “software” of programs and beliefs. If you’ve layered on positive beliefs about yourself, you will probably be enjoying a pretty wild an amazing life. If you’ve taken on beliefs of not good enough, better than/worse than, fear, regret, shame/guilt, or anger, well your life may feel a bit different.

When it comes to being distracted, we are defining ‘conscious distraction’ as thinking about something else while doing something. Here’s a short list of familiar circumstances for being distracted:

  • Driving
  • Riding a bike
  • Taking a walk
  • Swimming
  • Gardening
  • Repetitive-task jobs/hobbies
  • Doing something while having a conversation (mental math, texting, problem solving, reflecting, etc.)

In contrast to being fully present, each of the above circumstances create black holes in your memory. You might find you drove all the way home — perfectly — but you don’t remember making any decisions, any cars that were in front or behind you, or which turns came first or last. The same thing can be true with any of the other situations/activities, in that you can operate from a subconscious space and carry them out.

Well, these ‘subconscious activities and behaviors’ account for about 95% of your day. Due to the nature of work, family life, responsibilities, etc., we spend a lot of time consciously focusing our efforts on one thing while attending to another. For example, I am consciously focused on writing you, so if someone in this coffeeshop were to ask me if I wanted another green tea, I would likely respond from an old belief or program buried in my subconscious. If my family were to call my phone, it might take me a minute or two to transition out of this writing focus and be fully present with them; that is, of course, if I didn’t know to observe the pattern and how my mind works.

You and I, well, we know. We get to choose. We can consciously shift our attention, focus, and beliefs. We can consciously tell our subconsciousnesses how awesome our lives are, how lucky we are, and we can ask intelligent questions like: why am I so lucky? And why is my life so incredible? And why do I get to help everyone I come in contact with, but only feel more energized and vibrant every time I do?

Today’s thought exercise: here are a few helpful screening questions to determine if you have any old beliefs or programs in your subconscious mind you might prefer to shift into something different?

  • Am I lucky or unlucky?
  • Is life easy or hard?
  • Am I connected to (insert: God/Universe/all that is)?
  • Am I going to have an amazing day today?
  • Do I love my relationships, including with myself?
  • Can I do anything I want if I truly set my mind and heart to it?
  • Am I limited in my life?
  • Out of anyone in the world, who do I love the most? (if the answer is not you, you may want to reconsider)

Choose your responses wisely. Embrace the feeling associated with the answer you choose. Consciously focus on what it ‘would’ feel like to be able to answer as you prefer. Pretend you’re lucky, feel what that ‘would’ feel like, and then answer ‘lucky’ for example. Consciously keep that feeling with you, and your subconscious will memorize it.

Your ideal reality begins with this moment. And this moment. And this moment again. With one slice of ‘now’ at a time your life can become anything you choose.

Sent to you with love, honor, and in service,

Kareem


Originally published at drkareem.com on January 19, 2018.

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