Things I Wish I Knew When I Was 6

“It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken man”

Pixabay Photo

It is trendy: people, successful or not, sharing life experiences and tips they wish to had at 20, 30, 40 years old.

Yes, we care!

But please, who wants to wait that long for some great insights.

6 years old is important. It is the age when girls start to have gender beliefs and feel inferior to men. It is the age when you start taking decisions on your own yet have little understanding of their repercussions on your future. Youth is the period for creativity and big wishes yet there are so many aspects not understood correctly.

Here are the 4 tips every 6 years old should know:

1) Making your bed is not about making your bed

It is about completing the first task of the day properly. The consecutive accomplishments of little tasks that ultimately become routine are the skeleton of your day: make sure it is a strong one able to overcome life’s downturns.

2) Being the last chosen in the team during sports class

Don’t categorize yourself through people’s perception. How can they guess your ability to dribble, run, jump and kick by looking at you standing in the line? Understanding that at 6 is a gift, because it repeats constantly over life.

Pixabay Photo

3) What job do you want to do when you grow up?

Most of the “I don’t know” really mean “so many things you won’t believe me”. Go! tell your parents and teachers what your dreams are. They expect one answer because society has slowly killed imagination and innovation. It is your right to think big and your duty to prevent the modern world from dragging you down.

4) It is OK to fall

As routines are your skeleton, failures are the injuries that weaken it for a short period of time just to enable you to build it stronger. We have 206 bones and it takes around 20 years to complete ossification. Imagine how lucky you are to be 6: an infinite amount of opportunities to fail and raise stronger.

If most of the kids ignore that, still a majority of adults do too.

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