The Reading List: Why Are Junior Researchers Travelling Less?

Articles and videos that explore the issues junior researchers face when it comes to visiting, studying and working abroad

Have thoughts on why junior researchers are travelling less? We want to hear what you think. Take part in our .

For researchers, travelling abroad is generally an enriching experience. In our recent , 96% of responders suggested that travelling benefits research. The opportunity to attend conferences, take part in international collaboration or take up positions in other labs is linked with better career prospects and progression. And yet, junior researchers are the least likely to benefit from these opportunities.

Junior researchers are much less likely to travel than their more senior counterparts. In fact, 54% of student or trainee researchers surveyed said that they very rarely or never travel for work. They were also almost twice as likely to have stayed in one place than their more senior peers. And just 8% of early career and 2% of student and trainee researchers identify as high-frequency travellers.

Are junior researchers choosing to travel less, or is there a lack of opportunities and support for those who want to visit and work abroad?

Have you been affected by this issue? We want to hear from you on why you think junior researchers are travelling less. Take part in our .

Then join the conversation on , or by .

This reading list provides an introduction to the issue of early career travel. There’s no one single answer to the question of why junior researchers are travelling less, but by creating a dialogue, we can uncover more about the issue and work towards a system that supports junior researchers as effectively as possible.

Quick Reads

Sarah Kellogg — Nature Exploring the opportunities and pitfalls of taking part in large international collaborations early on in a research career

Hywel Curtis—Nature Advice on boosting your global profile, from making connections to collaborating on international projects

Albert Antolin — The Wellcome Trust A Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellow shares his journey from Barcelona to London, and the challenges he encountered along the way.

Lee Barrett —Nature The author suggests that junior researchers are under undue pressure to move internationally

Seema Sharma and Rachel Gallagher — Mendeley From tax treaties to social networks, a short list of considerations for junior researchers thinking of working abroad

Giovanni Camanni — Science Is pressure to compete drowning out scientific collaboration and harming researchers? One postdoc shares his experiences

Roberta Kwok— Science Exploring the cultural differences students encounter when they choose to join labs in other parts of the world

A Little More Detail

Elisabeth Pain — Science This feature explores the costs and benefits of early career travel

Various Authors —The Guardian A panel of experts share their advice for junior researchers who want to establish an international career

Seema Sharma and Rachel Gallagher — Mendeley One researcher’s experience of moving internationally after finishing a PhD, and advice for others considering doing the same

Rhiannon Pugh and Elisa Thomas —RSA Regions A dialogue between two early career researchers with different experiences of and views on international mobility

The Irish Marie Curie Office — YouTube Dr Pelagia Glampedaki speaks about her experiences of studying and working abroad throughout her career

Have thoughts on why junior researchers are travelling less? We want to hear what you think. Take part in our .

Together Science Can is a global campaign to celebrate and protect scientific collaboration.

and spread the word.

#TogetherScienceCan

Together Science Can

Started by organisations worldwide to celebrate and protect international collaboration. The time is now to speak as one. #TogetherScienceCan

Together Science Can

Written by

A global campaign to celebrate & protect scientific collaboration. Join the campaign and spread the word. #TogetherScienceCan

Together Science Can

Started by organisations worldwide to celebrate and protect international collaboration. The time is now to speak as one. #TogetherScienceCan