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In The Green Room with… Rat Boy

Cult indie rock singer-songwriter Rat Boy is launching his DYSTOPIA WORLD of music and art as NFTs exclusively with TokenTraxx.

The UK artist, aka Jordan Cardy, is inviting his fans to enter his illustrated world where eerie, yet captivating characters, items and emblems will be paired with brand new tracks and packaged as NFTs. Fans will be able to join gangs and collaborate as the story unfolds in an everlasting turf war. Find out more over at tokentraxx.com/artists/dystopia

We sit down with Rat Boy (aka Jordan Cardy…or ‘dickhead’ to his mates) to find out a little more about the indie rock star.

Why are you called Rat Boy?

A girl I went out with in Year 6 at school gave me the nickname. When I was 16, I decided that I quite liked it so I used it as my name on SoundCloud, and it has stuck ever since.

What is one message you would give to people trying to get into the music industry today?

Everyone has different situations, but for me personally, I did everything on my own so I could self-release. I saved up for enough equipment to develop, produce and release my own music.

The laptop was expensive and was a big investment for me at that time. But it was worth it because I was able to produce from home and not have to pay for studio time.

Mike Skinner and Jamie T were able to produce and develop their own music and they have been big inspirations for me.

If you were an app, what would you be?

YouTube. I have 40,000 subscribers to my channel.

I use YouTube a lot for videos. It’s a platform where I learn a new a song or get some production ideas. I pretty much find most of my samples from YouTube.

I get a bit lost on TikTok.

What’s been a particular failure or success which you learnt the most from?

I try and forget the failures. I always try new stuff and experiment.

When I started out, I sent out loads of CDs to people but then none of the CDs worked because they all got jammed in the CD players because I had spray painted them!

I posted most of them to the wrong places. I emailed lots of people my music and then those bounced back. I sent so much to people across social media that some people even blocked me!

But I didn’t stop. And then it was all worth it when Parlophone Records came to one of my first gigs at The Basement in Chelmsford. We rehearsed a lot for it and then we got signed up by them.

What I learnt from it was don’t stop and don’t give up.

What’s the most useless talent you have?

I fingerboard a lot and make finger skateboards out of wood which is a very relaxing hobby.

I also make mini fingerboard parks with mini graffiti. It was something I spent a lot of time doing during the Covid lockdown.

Is there a standout moment in your life?

I remember a gig in Manchester where we were supporting Liam Gallagher with the biggest crowd we’ve ever performed in front of. Then a bottle hit me as soon as I walked on.

I thought: “Oh no, we’ve got a 30-minute set in front of Liam Gallagher fans who all think that we are shit!”

It went alright in the end, though. We must have been OK as I didn’t get any more bottles thrown at me.

…And a moment to forget?

We tend to jump around on stage a lot. I have had a few falls off the stage and once fell on to the drummer and pulled down the curtain in front of Steve Lamacq which was a bit embarrassing.

Do you have a favourite photo?

The Iconic Bass Guitar Smashing Photo on the Clash’s London Calling is my favourite photo.

If you weren’t in music, what would you be up to right now?

Probably racing cars. I come from a family of motorheads. My brother, grandad and dad have raced cars their whole lives, so I’d be doing something like that for sure.

Do you collect in anything obscure?

Collect in classic cars, bits of cars, Japanese cars. I have four cars.

I go to a Car Boot Fair every Sunday. I am a bit of a hoarder.

What has been your proudest professional moment?

When I got signed by Kendrick Lamar - that was sick as he is one of my favourite artists. I am very proud of that.

Best advice you have ever been given?

I work with Tim Armstrong (singer of the punk rock band Rancid) and I signed to his label. Working alongside him has inspired me.

It is not what he has said, it’s watching his worth ethic which has made me work harder.

What would be the title of a song and an album about you and your life?

A series of unfortunate events.

To find out more about Rat Boy’s NFT collection “Dystopia World” head over to tokentraxx.com/artists/dystopia, choose your gang and enter dystopia.

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