Leia em português em: bit.ly/torus-tempo

Time: the most valuable resource

Gustavo Nogueira (Gust)
May 21 · 9 min read

What is ‘’time”? According to philosopher Aristotle, time is the measure of change. And change is our only constant.

Defined by the physicist Carlo Rovelli as the greatest remaining mystery, until these days we cannot fully understand time. But it is definitely a subject that affects our daily lives. Psychologist Philip Zimbardo says that the way we orient ourselves towards the past, present and future drives our happiness and success. Author Daniel Pink shows that timing is really a science, and our lives are an endless stream of “when” decisions. The currency of the present time is no longer a currency, but time itself. Between approaches in philosophy, physics, psychology, and economics, understanding the intersections between these different lenses is necessary to develop a more holistic perspective on our relationship with time.

I am Gustavo Nogueira (Gust)

I have dedicated my last 5 years to research and study time. This subject accompanies me since my youth when I decided to start the graduation in Physics while studying Social Communication. This interest also remained latent when I quit that to dedicate myself only to the study of the social sciences. After all, the zeitgeist is a social manifestation of our collective perception of the time in which we live. And it is in this approach that I have since invested my creative, strategic and, more recently, entrepreneurial power.

Aster. Chronos. Kairos. Quantum.

From the moment our hunter-gatherer ancestors came together around the campfire to tell stories, we talked about time. As we observe the stars, the “Aster” time, a dance that we perceive to occur in a different rhythm from ours, here on earth; by observing nature, the “Chronos” time, the cycles and patterns that can be controlled, and which have allowed us to develop agriculture and with that the earliest civilizations beyond nomadism; and by looking at what exists within us, the subtle, subjective “Kairos” time, in which experiences occur and one hour may seem to take a year or a minute in what we call the flow state.

Temporal orientations in perspective

Psychologist Philip Zimbardo says that the way we orient ourselves in relation to the past, present, and future influences and drives our relationship with the reality around us. We turn to the future without knowing what we want from it and without taking into account what has already happened. This time-related myopia brings consequences such as lack of memory and the propensity to commit the same mistakes from the past.

We would, then, be in the year 12,019 HE — the calendar count of the Human Era.

Futurism hangover

After a brief history of time, the focus here turns to the cultural context. I had experienced an immersion in my relationship with time through an experience guided by Inesplorato, a knowledge curatorship startup, who prepared me a special box on the subject. In it, an article planted in me a provocation, like a seed: why could we predict the invention of smartphones but not the entry of women into the workplace? “Futurism is living a cultural blindness”, journalist Tom Vanderbilt told me in an article signed on Nautilus Magazine in 2015.

We predicted cell phones, but not women in the workplace.

Correcting our myopia about time

Daniel Pink in his book “When” shows us that in addition to the “how” manuals, our lives are an endless stream of “when” decisions. The currency of the present time is no longer a currency, but time itself. Our next steps as humanity will also depend on balance: between the different temporal perspectives; among the different areas of knowledge that are related; and among the various voices that need a place in this dialogue. The lenses of sociology and culture are also necessary from experts representing different peoples, origins, ethnicities.

TORUS was designed to be a movement of an era yet to come. A guide between sociopolitical questions, philosophical questions, and answers that emerge from artistic, cultural and also technological expressions. That is why we understand the world from what it can become, not from what it is, and we translate the world as it happens.

Today we are a global network of people living in different places around the world. We believe it is possible to change the world by changing the way we relate to time. And we promote spaces in which this relationship can be rethought and re-signified. One of the projects we have invested a lot of dedication on, for example, is a learning experience called Zeitgeist Navigators, in which guidelines on challenges and opportunities for the 21st-century travelers are shared. Another project is our ongoing study group about time in which we host specialists weekly from the most diverse areas for a safe exchange space that feeds us. Also, we apply our studies as advisors on how to dialogue with the spirit of our time and potentialize the relationships that we are all building with the reality around us.

How is your relationship with time?

Torus

We are TORUS, a global movement based in São Paulo and Amsterdam that promotes changes in how people and companies connect with time. We want to transform the way the world connects with time: helping social initiatives, brands and people to use it as a resource in their favor.

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Gustavo Nogueira (Gust)

Written by

Founder and CEO at Torus ⧖ Temporality Researcher, Consultant, Strategist, Teacher, Time Traveler.

Torus

Torus

We are TORUS, a global movement based in São Paulo and Amsterdam that promotes changes in how people and companies connect with time. We want to transform the way the world connects with time: helping social initiatives, brands and people to use it as a resource in their favor.