Agile Project Management with GitLab vs JIRA

Naz Eylem Kaya
Aug 20 · 5 min read

We decided to stock our codes, done product developments on GitLab lately. Formerly, I have used JIRA, Microsoft Project, Microsoft Excel in order to plan, track and monitor projects. While we stop using stash, I tested GitLab if it satisfies our backlog/project management needs.

There were two reasons. First, DevTeam and I could lead projects from a single platform. Second, GitLab enables us to track 4 Core Metrics: Cycle Time; Lead Time, MTTR, CFR. I listed all of the requirements that I use while leading projects on JIRA.

Product Backlog

  • Create userstories
  • Edit userstories
  • Move userstories within projects
  • Add image/folder
  • Add detail to userstories
  • Labeling
  • Create epic
  • Prioritize
  • Storypoints/Weight
  • History
  • Comment
  • Listing

Scrum Board

  • Status
  • Drag/Drop Cards
  • Assignee (Both test/dev)
  • Sprint Creation

Monitoring Performance

I demonstrated a demo to see if GitLab satisfies what JIRA offers me as a software.

Review:

How to Apply

While using GitLab, you can a create user story and simply add details, assign ownerships, story point, epic, sprint, labels to it.

Product Backlog

Creating/Handling Product Backlog

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Picture 1: Creating User Stories

User story details can be added to the description of the issue. All that “given,when,then” and “scenarios” jazz. And also, you can attach files on it. Furthermore, you can assign multiple people to a user story which helps us see who is responsible for development and test.

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Picture 2: Adding userstory details

You can also link dependent user stories. Since we aim to connect user story to api’s, a user move user story(issue) to another Project ( “example-api”) by simply clicking “move” button.

Adding User Stories to a Sprint

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Picture 3: Creating a Sprint

Now you are able to add user stories to a sprint. If you want to state any detail information about the sprint, you can use milestone’s description. You can set a milestone for a specific project or a group. While creating sprints, be careful about it ✌️

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Picture 4: Adding an issue to a sprint

Adding Labels

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Picture 5: Adding Labels

You can select color of the label which could help us to visualize importance. For example you can add a “bug” label and select color red.

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Picture 6: New label color selection

ScrumBoard

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Picture 7: Generate Scrumboard

You can simply drag and drop user stories(issues) within status(labels) which enable us to track the flow of work. Other labels are still seen on the user story cards. You can distinguish which card is “pair,bug,prod-bug,sprint-bug” etc.

Moreover, you can create multiple boards, add filters and use it for different areas such as technical analysis, ux/uı analysis and so on. If you want to use a board for your technical analysis. Just create labels like “TA-Needed”- “TA-Done”. Create a “tech-analysis board”. Select the board. Filter it for the sprint(milestone). Then ta-da you have a board for technical analysis for the future sprint.

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Picture 8: Multiple boards

Monitoring Performance

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Picture 9: Monitoring Performans

If you open a milestone, you can see burndown chart. Besides that, GitLab enables bunch of new analytics. But that should be a new article 😊

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Picture 10: Burndown Chart

Conclusion

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I was thinking that on gitlab issues are either open or closed. When I used it, I see that you can generate your own status. Fully customizable multiple boards will be useful in a future. It presents epics in timeline format that JIRA doesn’t offer, is game-changing from the roadmap view.

By the way, there are some cons. First, I sometimes stuck on navigation. I lost my way while creating labels, boards, milestones. For example, I created a milestone to a project, not a group. Then I wanted to start a sprint, but it applied only on one project. Second, there is no control over status, such as you can add a user story without story point on a sprint.

To sum up, my user-experience as a product manager is very similar to JIRA. Gitlab satisfies all of my needs and requirements. Furthermore, it is much more flexible. Teams can adopt software easily and change it according to their needs.

Trendyol Tech

Trendyol Tech Team

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