The Best Classic Movies Streaming on Tubi TV

If you’re a fan of classic film, it can be a challenge to find movies that will sate your old Hollywood craving. However, Tubi has a great selection of titles that stand the test of time, including silent beauties, Oscar-winning dramas, and hilarious comedies. These are the best classic movies streaming now on Tubi TV, and we’re always adding more to our Classics category.

Best Classic Movies Streaming on Tubi TV

To Be or Not to Be (1942)

Nazi-occupied Poland might not seem the the best setting for a comedy, but director Ernst Lubitsch brings his famed touch to the setting with hilarious results. Carole Lombard and Jack Benny star in this essential film.

Paths of Glory (1958)

Stanley Kubrick’s anti-war classic stars Kirk Douglas as a World War I commanding officer who defends his soldiers in a court-martial. It may have been set at the beginning of the 20th century and made in the middle of it, but it’s still a vital film in the 21st century.

Charade (1964)

Audrey Hepburn and Cary Grant charm each other — and the audience — in this genre-bending film that melds romance, mystery, and comedy. Shot in Paris, Charade is one of cinema’s most purely fun movies that feels like Hitchcock, but is all director Stanley Donen.

Foreign Correspondent (1940)

Less well-known than Alfred Hitchcock‘s other 1940 film, Rebecca, this is still a cracking spy thriller that marked the director’s second American outing. Starring Joel McCrea and Laraine Day, Foreign Correspondent also features Edmund Gwenn (Miracle on 34th Street) in a very non-Santa-like role.

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920)

Though it was released in 1920, this German Expressionist film still ranks among some of the best cinematography in movie history. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari mixes fantasy and horror, resulting in one of the essential silent films.

Stalag 17 (1953)

Like To Be or Not to Be, this Billy Wilder film mines World War II for comedy, as well as some intense drama. William Holden won an Oscar for playing Sgt. J.J. Sefton, a POW suspected by his fellow prisoners of being an informant.

Night of the Living Dead (1968)

What would our movie and TV landscape look like without George A. Romero‘s zombie classic? It not only prepared the way for other Romero classics like Dawn of the Dead, but it also inspired everything from The Walking Dead to Shaun of the Dead.

The Killing (1956)

This Stanley Kubrick film noir stars Sterling Hayden as a career criminal whose last heist doesn’t go according to plan. Though it is an early entry in the director’s filmography, its nonlinear structure indicates the future genius to come from the filmmaker.

Nosferatu (1922)

We love F.W. Murnau‘s moody use of shadow in this silent classic that basically brings the story of Dracula to the screen under another name. Max Schreck‘s committed performance was the subject of the also-great Shadow of the Vampire almost eight decades later.

Paper Moon (1973)

Peter Bogdanovich‘s nostalgic road movie boasts gorgeous black-and-white cinematography from Laszlo Kovacs, a charming con man script from Alvin Sargent, and an Oscar-winning performance from nine-year-old Tatum O’Neal, playing alongside her real-life dad Ryan O’Neal.

Great Expectations (1947)

One of the first movies selected for the Criterion Collection (spine #31), this David Lean drama is an Oscar winner that brings Charles Dickens‘ novel to life. Great Expectations features the credited film debut of Alex Guinness as Fagin, who later worked with Lean on Lawrence of Arabia, Dr. Zhivago, and A Passage to India.

McLintock! (1963)

The film’s tagline — “He Tamed the West. But Could He Tame Her?” — is definitely a relic of the past, but this Western is still incredibly watchable. A lot of that is due to its stars, frequent collaborators John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara, whose fiery chemistry here and in The Quiet Man is one of the best pairings in movie history.

And Then There Were None! (1945)

This Agatha Christie adaptation influenced movies from Clue to Identity. If you’ve read the novel or seen the other versions, this excellent whodunit still deserves a viewing, and not just because it changes up the ending.

The Man with the Golden Arm (1955)

This Otto Preminger drama starts off with opening titles from Saul Bass, with the rest of the film offering a strong performance from Frank Sinatra. The icon plays a gambler who struggles with drug addiction, a subject which caused this film to be released without the Production Code seal.

The Hitch-hiker (1953)

This masterful crime thriller boasts actress Ida Lupino behind the camera, offering a rare noir directed by a woman. The serial killer at its heart (played by William Talman) can go toe-to-toe with more famous on-screen murderers.

The Little Princess (1939)

A great entry point for the next generation of classic film fans, this sweet children’s movie stars Shirley Temple in the title role. Frances Hodgson Burnett‘s novel finds the child star playing a privileged but kind student at an all-girls school who finds her fortunes changed overnight.

Which classic movies are your favorite? Tell us in the comments.


Originally published at tubitv.wpengine.com on June 20, 2017.