15 Things to Consider for Your UX Portfolio

Loe Lee
UX Magazine
Published in
4 min readJul 1, 2020

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If you’re looking for a UX job, recruiters and hiring managers need to confirm you have fundamental UX skills like researching, sketching, workshopping, writing, and prototyping. They also want to see your impact on the business because they want you to help them make money. Did your designs lead to less customer pain and support calls? Did they make the company more revenue? Design skills and their application (impact) make for great designers. I’m a Design Manager and I often look at design portfolios to determine whether or not I should reach out.

Things to consider

Assuming I’ve convinced you of the value of a UX portfolio, here are 15 things to consider when creating one.

  1. Display your work with minimal to no clicks: When work is hidden or behind multiple clicks, it takes hiring managers longer to review. They also use this experience as a signal for how you design for discoverability. If they can’t find your work in your portfolio, can your users find what they need in your designs?
  2. Avoid grey text: When managers are hiring, they’re looking at many resumes and portfolios a day. Their eyes are often fatigued so focusing on images and words takes more energy. When in doubt, avoid grey text. It makes it hard to quickly scan your content.
  3. Avoid small text: This has the same impact as grey text. Makes it hard to read.
  4. Avoid more than 3 text styles: This is similar to 2 and 3 but it isn’t because of legibility, it’s because a hiring manager’s brain has to do more work to take in more font variations.
  5. Avoid changing text and image alignment: This makes it harder to scan your work. A hiring manager’s brain has to find a new and different starting point if your content moves around.
  6. Avoid center aligned paragraphs: Same as 5. This is hard to scan because of the changing starting point. 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 are all applications of the Unity Design Principle.
  7. Include sub-headers or H2s: This helps managers scan your projects and design process.
  8. Include text: This helps managers know how you think. Are you succinct? A good story teller? Persuasive in your presentation of a problem and why

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Loe Lee
UX Magazine

Design Manager @ HubSpot, Mom, Artist