Sketch Tutorials

5 Ways to Keep Your Sketch Kitchen Clean

Jon Moore
Jon Moore
Jul 21, 2016 · 6 min read
Look how nicely that meal is grouped inside of its bounding box! So fresh! So clean!

Disclaimer: I just ate, so food is on my mind. Just roll with me.

A kitchen so clean that they let the patrons watch!

1. Stick to a Baseline Grid

I’m not gonna tell you to use any particular size, just as long as you stick to it. I personally prefer an 8px baseline grid because of it plays nicely with various typographic standards and has more divisors (1, 2, 4, 8px) vs. (1, 5, 10px), but I know 10px baseline grids are popular since all design applications ship with Shift+← as 10px. So use whatever floats your tugboat. You can use Nudg.it to change the default Shift+← distance to save yourself time. This does wonders when you’re designing in a style like Google Material Design that works off of an 8px grid.

2. Use Bounding boxes

Once you’ve set your baseline grid, it’s incredibly useful to use bounding boxes to keep objects on your artboard organized and spaced consistently. In the image below, I use bounding boxes for each tab item, and don’t actually have to put any space between the tab groups. The spacing is built into the bounding box, so each tab is snug against the one next to it. Using a plugin like Ken Moore’s Relabel Button will allow you to create evenly spaced tabs like this in seconds.

3. Never Use Lines for Dividers

While we’re on the topic of click area sizes, can we talk about how difficult it is to grab a line segment?! It’s like Sketch is saying “We know there are 2 million pixels on the screen, but you need to click just this one. Not that o…nope…the…nope…almos…nailed i…nope.”

4. Organize Your Styles and Symbols

This one is easy. Did you know you can create style and symbol submenus in Sketch? By putting slashes in your style and symbol names, you can create an organized “folder” structure for finding things later.

It even alphabetizes things in your submenu for you! Thanks, Sketch!

5. Name Your Layers…All of Them

Select an object on your artboard and learn this hotkey sequence:

UX Power Tools

A publication for designers, written by designers.

UX Power Tools

A publication for designers, written by designers.

Jon Moore

Written by

Jon Moore

Principal Design Partner Innovatemap in Indianapolis. Creator of The Design Encyclopedia (https://www.designencyclopedia.io). Email: 1jonmoore@gmail.com

UX Power Tools

A publication for designers, written by designers.