Venture Out Community Agreements

What are Community Agreements, and why do they matter?

Community agreements help clarify roles, responsibilities and group expectations during events. At Venture Out, we believe that in order for the conversation to be meaningful, it needs to come from everyone! We’ve adapted our community agreements from a resource written by the Anti-Oppressive Resource and Training Alliance (AORTA) (pst, this is a great place to start if you’re looking for rad resources).

ONE DIVA, ONE MIC

We ask that one person speak at a time and leave a few moments in between speakers for those who might need more time to process or are less comfortable interjecting in conversation.

NO ONE KNOWS EVERYTHING; TOGETHER WE KNOW A LOT

We believe that each person has something to contribute to the conversation. We ask that you practice being humble, share what you know, and look for what you can learn from each person in the room.

MOVE UP, MOVE UP

If you’re someone who tends to not speak a lot, please move up into a role of speaking more.

If you tend to speak a lot, please move up into a role of listening more.

In both cases, growth is happening!

WE CAN’T BE ARTICULATE ALL THE TIME

Often, we hesitate to participate for fear of “messing up” or stumbling over words. We want everyone to feel comfortable participating, even if you don’t feel you have the perfect words to express your thoughts. Here is the place to try things out. Even if you “mess up”, we can work on the language together.

BE AWARE OF TIME

Please respect everyone’s time commitment, and refrain from speaking in long monologues. There is plenty of time for that 1-on-1.

EMBRACE CURIOSITY

We make better decisions when we approach our problems and challenges with questions (“What if we…?”) and curiosity. Allow space for play, curiosity, and creative thinking.

ACKNOWLEDGE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN INTENT AND IMPACT

Sometimes people say or do things that cause harm, even when it is not their intention to do so. But when we use our good intentions to deny (or avoid being accountable), more harm can be caused. We ask that we each do the work to acknowledge that our intent and impact of our actions are two different things, and to take responsibility to any negative impact we we may create. This can be as simple as apologizing.


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