Maker Studios Creators Talk YouTube Mentorship…in Singapore

Maker Studios held its Maker Bootcamp in Singapore for the first time this year, bringing together established and aspiring online video creators for a two-day workshop in late May. Well-known creators such as Timothy DeLaGhetto, the Fung Bros, Jake McCoy, Sarah Snitch, Tiffany Alvord, and Sam Macaroni from the US mentored alongside Singapore’s Munah & Hirzi and Shigga Shay.

We got a chance to ask a few of the creators who were in Singapore at the Bootcamp about mentorship and the creative environment in the country they were mentoring in. Here’s what some of them had to say…

Hirzi (from Munah & Hirzi):

What does “YouTube mentorship” mean to you? What does being a YouTube mentor entail in practice?

The mentorship was such an honor. To be a part of and in the same league as other creators from around the world is unreal! It also feels like you’re a part of the next wave of content creation and consumption, and passing on that experience to hopeful young creators is pretty sweet! If anything, we were learning each day of the bootcamp just by sitting in and listening.

I guess being a Youtube Mentor required us to not be selfish with understanding and sharing our successes but at the same time being totally open minded to listen in to new ideas and fresh perspectives from this new brand of creators. Tim DeLaGhetto and the Fung Bros said that YouTube has a new era every two years, and I cannot agree more. In always keeping a fresh brand image, we must always be open to welcoming the next era with a collaborative disposition.

Munah and Hirzi

Do you think there’s anything particular about the culture in Singapore that makes for a great environment for YouTube creators? Why do you think YouTube creators are so popular in Singapore?

It’s such a concentrated market! And internet connectivity is one of the highest in the world. Given the advanced infrastructure, it is a market waiting to be served. On top of that, youths see that there is a little less clamp on content moderation online, and this honesty translates into our videos, which is different than what Singaporeans watch on mainstream media. It’s more real and readily available. That’s why Singapore is so popular with creators.

Munah (from Munah & Hirzi):

What does “YouTube mentorship” mean to you? What does being a YouTube mentor entail in practice?

Being a mentor to me meant that you’re able to share the highs and lows of YouTube, allowing these creators to prepare for what’s to come. It’s definitely a learning experience for me, as well, because YouTube is always about experimenting and creating something new. Being able to work closely with all these creators allowed us learn about new concepts and delving further into creating fresh new stuff online.

Do you think there’s anything particular about the culture in Singapore that makes for a great environment for YouTube creators?

The market in Singapore has really allowed for many YouTube creators to boom because of the kind of liberty the online industry provides in terms of content and ideas. It is a very concentrated market, too, and many look online for content and information, which really helps. Content-wise, there are always things that are very relatable and shareable for the viewers here, which makes YouTube the next big thing here.

Fung Bros:

FungBros went to Singapore

What does “YouTube mentorship” mean to you? What does being a YouTube mentor/mentee entail in practice?

YouTube mentorship means that even in a fledgling industry, we were able to pass down the knowledge that has developed over the years. It’s about growing the pie, so there’s success for everyone. The fact that we got to collaborate with artists from all over Southeast Asia made this YouTube mentorship unique from any panels we did in the past. I was so blown away by the Asian artists we worked with — they were all self-driven, and we just bounced the idea a few times to guide it.

How come you were chosen to go to Singapore for the bootcamp?

We make so much cultural content about being Asian and particularly how being Asian interfaces with Western society. Whether it’s being Asian-American or stereotypes the West has about Singapore/Malaysia — we’ve addressed it at some point in our content. That I’m sure was a big reason, but also we’re teachers at heart. If we weren’t YouTubers, maybe we would be teachers or professors. We just think that ultimately talking about complex, nuanced, “tough” issues such as culture is very positively impactful.

Jake McCoy:

Do you think there’s anything particular about the culture in Singapore that makes for a great environment for YouTube creators?

I think Singapore is a great place for anyone trying to grow their channel and anyone in general because it’s so under the radar. Before I visited I didn’t know much about Singapore. There’s a lot to learn and a lot to see. I think if growing channels were to shoot original content in front of landmarks in the city, it would grab a lot of attention from viewers around the world. I think YouTube is so popular in Singapore because just like in the US, we can see ourselves in our favorite YouTubers because they’re not these larger than life personalities, they’re just regular people who entertain us.

Sarah Snitch:

Do you think there’s anything particular about the culture in Singapore that makes for a great environment for YouTube creators?

I personally found Singapore to be a really fast paced, motivated place. YouTube has kind of saturated US culture, but it hasn’t gotten to that point in Singapore, so I’ve seen that a lot of the creators there feel limitless, which is leading to a lot of innovative, creative content. US YouTube culture is still creating new, exciting content every day, but it felt to me as if Singapore was just on the brink of exploding.

Tiffany Alvord went to Singapore

Tiffany Alvord:

What does “YouTube mentorship” mean to you? What does being a YouTube mentor/mentee entail in practice?

YouTube mentorship to me means to help other YouTubers understand the process of being a YouTuber. For example, giving advice on how to make the most of what their goals are and what they are trying to accomplish with their channels is one way to help. I mentored by analyzing and guiding in areas such as posting videos, consistency, thumbnails, monetization, brands, multi-channel networks, collaborations, brainstorming ideas, etc. I feel there is so much to grasp and when you are just starting out, or even if you’ve been doing it for a while, there is always something to learn and ways to jumpstart the process and take out the guesswork. Mentoring is giving them a 101 of YouTube and how it works.