The more you know — the more you see

Have you ever asked yourself who’s that actor? where was that scene shot? what music is being played? or what is the meaning of a recent plot twist? If you’re a Millenial with a mobile, there’s a 50% chance you even go further and look up some show-related information, while watching TV.

We’ve been living in the golden age of television for more than a decade. Even though as an industry, television has been resistant to the disruptive power of the internet (TV advertising spending is still blooming), it has radically transformed as an art form. The most respected actors and directors are shifting their careers into television and not regretting it a bit. Multi-million dollars are invested in productions that spread across 50 minutes episodes, portraying fantastic stories and great novel and film adaptations (Game of Thrones, Westworld, House of Cards and Fargo, to name a few). Television is no longer just a passive form of entertainment. Some shows require us to go further, to unveil the hidden layers of the richest stories of our times. As the philosopher and writer, Aldous Huxley said: we have become a visually mediated society, and the more we know — the more we see.

IMDB, TMDB, Fandom, Reddit and many other blogs and websites are doing a great job not just at gathering the relevant data about shows, but also by providing platforms for viewers to share their excitement, theories and revelations as the series progress. The content creators powering these sites (i.e. the most dedicated viewers) are putting a lot of effort into breaking each episode to pieces — dissecting story lines, analysing dialogues and motifs, or listing the entire wardrobe and accessories of the most loved (or hated) characters. And since TV isn’t linear anymore, new viewers join the party every day.

Over the past few years, television has become the most dissected medium we have. Yet the tools we use to analyse it, are limited. What if you could access only the most relevant search results for any scene? You wouldn’t have to web-crawl to find your answers. You wouldn’t even need to type. All the relevant information would be there, organised on a timeline, synchronised with your show, ready to be revealed at any point in time.

A scene from Game of Thrones season 3 episode 9, no spoilers.

VIVI augments your viewing experience with all the internet’s knowledge. Our mission is to create the most granular dissection tools for viewers, content creators, media buyers and producers alike. With a seamless experience (mobile app or browser add-on) show-related information is easily linked to its relevant position on the timeline, so whenever you’re curious about something you hear or see on TV — VIVI can tell you what it is, with minimal disruption.

A scene from House of cards season 3 episode 3.