Inslee signs international agreement with Chile ambassador

Gov. Jay Inslee signed an agreement with Chilean Ambassador Alfonso Silva Navarro in Seattle yesterday to strengthen ties between Washington and Chile and advance areas of mutual interest.

“Our two regions have so much in common,” Inslee said. “There are a lot of high tech innovations going on in both of our communities. When we combine forces on things like technology, green energy, and climate change, we make each of our communities stronger.”

Yesterday’s agreement builds on the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that Inslee signed with Chile in Paris during the 2015 international climate change conference, and builds on official delegation visits from Chile in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

The signed MOU continues cooperation on various issues including clean energy, climate change, disaster risk education (such as forest fire or earthquake response), economic development and innovation, and artificial intelligence (AI).

Gov. Jay Inslee joins Chilean Ambassador Alfonso Silva Navarro in signing a memorandum of understanding in Seattle, November 27, 2018 (Office of the Governor photo)

The two leaders signed the agreement during an AI event that brought key leaders from Washington and Chile together to explore the latest tech developments. Chile and Amazon are currently discussing how to use “astrodata” from giant telescopes in Chile. Chile is also host of Google’s data center in Latin America. Chilean President Sebastian Pinera recently announced plans for an initiative that would use data and AI to increase healthcare quality.

Inslee; Senator Carolina Goic; Ambassador Silva; Mr. Guillermo Carey, president of AmCham Chile (Office of the Governor photo).

Inslee and Silva also talked about sending a Washington delegation to Chile to learn about the country’s clean energy efforts, innovation economy, and climate change strategies. Like Washington, Chile is exploring new ways to reduce their carbon footprint, bring more renewable energy sources (such as solar energy) on to the grid, and develop ways to keep our oceans healthy. The South American country is ahead of their goal to reduce carbon emissions by 30 percent before 2030. Chile even wants to introduce climate change classes into secondary education.

About 35 of the attendees were key government and business leaders from Chile, as well as AI business leaders from Washington.