Washington a model for seniors’ long-term care

Officials, agencies prepare for more older residents

The 2017 AARP scorecard. Click on the chart for more information.

Supporting family caregivers

Sally Brewer of La Conner wanted to receive care in her home following a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease in her mid-70s.

Sally Brewer of La Conner received long-term care in her home through professional caregivers and then a family caregiver following her diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Right: Bob and Sally Brewer in their wedding photo. Bob served as Sally’s in-home caregiver until her death in February. (Photos courtesy of Bob Brewer)
Family caregivers Jenny Jiminez, left, and Kimberly Baxter attend an annual, state-run training in June in Tukwila. The full-day conference offered a number of workshops to provide practical, up-to-date resources and information about caregiving, according to the Aging and Long-term Support Administration. (Department of Social and Health Services Photo)

Preparing for an older population

Despite the state’s success in improving its long-term care system, more will need to be done for a growing aging population.

Summit on Aging

In October 2013, Gov. Jay Inslee convened the state’s first Summit on Aging to build a strategic plan to prepare for a swelling older population.

Gov. Jay Inslee speaks in October 2013 during the Summit on Aging in Seattle. The summit brought experts together to form a strategic plan for preparing for an increase in our older population. (Official Governor’s Office Photo)

Washington State Governor's Office

News and updates from Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee and his administration.

WA Governor’s Office

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News and updates from Gov. Jay Inslee and his administration.

Washington State Governor's Office

News and updates from Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee and his administration.