noaa

Yes, July Was Wet

The 5th wettest July in the United States since records have been kept

NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) released their climate summary for the month of July on Tuesday and — unless you live in the Pacific Northwest — their findings were no surprise. It was very wet for many states across the United States. In fact, as a nation, it was the 5th wettest on record.

Digging into the stats, thirteen states across the eastern U.S. made it into the top ten for wettest Julys on record with Florida recording its wettest. That’s saying something especially considering the summer months are typically wet in the Sunshine State (both from summertime afternoon thunderstorms and tropical influence). The rain was most persistent in the Southeast where flooding became (and still is) a serious problem both in terms of property damage and crop damage.

On a city-by-city level, thirteen cities recorded their wettest January to July with Asheville, North Carolina measuring over fifty inches of rain. That’s more than two feet above average. As a person that lives in “the AVL” I can attest to the extreme sogginess. It has been a surreal late spring and summer — one in which you never really had to worry about sunblock and your house A/C took an extended rest. The cloud cover was stubborn and the rain seemed unrelenting. During one of the wettest stretches in Asheville, my own street became a victim of the prolonged rain as you can see in this video.

For those that are enduring this wet and cloudy summer of 2013, many are hoping for a change in the persistent wet pattern; one that provides stretches of sunshine before summer fades into fall. Unfortunately, with the heart of tropical season upon us, there is a worry (especially in the interior Southeast) that excessive rain from any inland-tracking tropical storm or hurricane will lead to even more devastating flooding. We shall wait and see.