Improve your wildlife photography by underexposing your image and bringing it back in Photoshop with Camera Raw Filter.
Goldfinch eating Sunflower hearts. Photo by Janice Gill.

Improve Your Wildlife Photography with One Easy Tip

You know better than your camera.

Janice Gill
Weeds & Wildflowers
3 min readDec 1, 2023

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One of my favourite subjects to photograph is wildlife — in particular birds and bees. There is one huge frustration, however, they move fast.

Those movements can be large, such as flying off when you least expect it, but also small, such as flicks of tails and head movements.

If you find a large number of your photos have too much motion blur, there is a way you can improve your hit rate. And you don’t have to spend a penny on fancy gear.

Under expose your images

This may sound like a bad move, especially if you have been taught to Expose To The Right (ETTR). ETTR means slightly overexposing and can help with noise levels and detail in a lot of images.

In sports and wildlife photography, however, things move fast. You’ll want the fastest shutter speed you can get without increasing the ISO and introducing noise.

The most effective way I’ve found of increasing the number of photographs I get without too much blur is to underexpose my images.

My preferred method is to bracket my exposures as then I can include a fully exposed shot, which, if there is no movement, will require the least work in post-processing.

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Janice Gill
Weeds & Wildflowers

Award winning Artist and Photographer still learning and evolving. Blogging the journey.